Business track

How do you take your open source idea from a simmer to a boil?
Share what you know about making a living in the f/oss world. From finding open source jobs, to choosing a software license, to open source-friendly business plans, to making the sales pitch and connecting with customers.. Example topics from the past include “Learn Tech Management in 45 Minutes” and “The Independent Software Developer."

Sessions for this track

* Building a Life with WordPress

If you're dying to stick it to the man, or just looking to make extra money on the side, this talk is for you. We'll explore ways you can leverage the most popular CMS on the planet to start or grow an online business.
Business
Kronda Adair

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp

* Finding funding for an open source based business

Ever had an open source project and wanted to figure out how to get funding for it? In this talk we'll discuss different funding methods, what angel's look for in open source companies, and potential funding options in Portland.
Business
Meghan McClelland

* Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.
Business
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Generations of Open Source and what to do about it

Open source has moved from experimental to mainstream in the past 10 years, but has definitely changed the landscape in the last 15 years. Because of that, we have a few generations of people within the broader ecosystem, and they probably have no idea that all of these communities exist, much less the fact that there's a whole ocean of a open source technology industry out there.
Business
Amye Scavarda

* Magic, Spontaneity or Planning: Different Approaches to Building an Open Source Foundation

Open Source Foundations start in a variety of ways. Often they begin organically to fill a need after a person or small group aims to "scratch an itch" and then needs an organization behind it. Some of these organizations can appear to happen out of nowhere. Other organizations are birthed from careful planning and intentional formation. There are still others that are a combination of the two. Different methods can create powerful impact, but some of the challenges are different. This talk with compare and contrast the ways foundations are formed and the advantages of different approaches.
Business
Kate Chapman

* Open Hardware Roadmap: From Here to Open Consumer Electronics

Open hardware is just getting off the ground. What is the path from where we are today to a world in which open hardware is as ubiquitous as open software? This talk lays out a roadmap, recounts the milestones already achieved, describes the milestones that are within sight, and predicts the milestones yet to come.
Business
Joshua Lifton

* Open source on Georgia's mind

The state of Georgia runs its web publishing platform using Drupal. This was the first open source implementation handled by any state at an enterprise level. Within a period of one year, the state needed to build a Drupal based platform and migrate 55 websites with new interface designs. This talk addresses the costs benefits Georgia saved by implementing open source and showcases some of the challenges and wins the state experienced while moving to open source.
Business
Nikhil Deshpande

* Supporting your Support: Give your Support Team Flowers, Chocolate, Money, and Stock Options

How to support your support team 1. Pay your support staff a living wage. There are many reasons why you should pay your support staff a living wage, including reduced stress and higher quality work. We don’t expect support staff to be paid on par with engineering, but they should receive the same benefits & perks as engineers. 2. Listen to your support team. Your support team has valuable, data-backed insights about your customers’ pain points. Prioritize support needs in terms of product improvements. 3. Support your colleagues’ career ambitions. Some people who work in support are interested in becoming engineers. You can encourage this by giving them time to learn coding or work on projects during work hours, or paying for educational materials or tech conferences. Respect the fact that not everyone wants to be an engineer as well. Support should be a viable career path in its own right.
Business
Kiera Manion-Fischer, Stephanie Snopek

* Towards an Ethics of Care: Understanding and Acknowledging Care Work in Technology Companies

This talk explores dimensions of care work and best practices for acknowledging and understanding care work in technology teams, and makes the business case for considering all involved with building and maintaining technologies in strategy and planning. I explore ways in which to track the hidden costs of care work, and build a discourse of sustainability and inclusion around care work in technology companies.
Business
Amelia Abreu

Proposals for this track

* Can You Build a Marketing Department on Open Source?

This talk will explore the state of open source marketing software, and the viability of using it to run a marketing department.
Business 2016-04-13 06:15:13 +0000
Justin Dunham

* Fail Early, Fail Often, Fail Well

If failure is inevitable, why aren't we taught how to cope with it? In this talk I outline 10 types of failure to avoid and detail a framework for navigating recovery from failures large and small.
Business 2016-04-11 00:59:34 +0000
Josh Simmons

* How not to fail with Open Source

Creating a open source project is not easy. Which license you have to choose and many other questions come up, if you are creating a open source project or library.
Business 2016-04-03 03:50:25 +0000
Patrik Karisch

* I don't know what I am doing

But, open source got me here. During this talk, I will invoke my inner Anthony Robbins to motivate others to contribute to open source in ways that they may not have considered before -- by illustrating how open source has open doors in my career and how anyone can have the same doors opened. I am not special. I did things.
Business 2016-04-21 06:36:49 +0000
Jackie Kazil

* Open Source Software for Product Managers (Freeloaders are necessary)

There are simple rules to understand when building products from open source software. Product teams (from engineering to marketing) need to understand these rules to participate best in open source project communities and deliver products and services to their customers at the same time. These rules hold regardless of whether the vendor created and owns the project or participates.
Business 2016-04-21 02:39:14 +0000
Stephen Walli

* Software Patents After Alice: A Long and Sad Tail

The Supreme Court's ruling in the landmark Alice vs. CLS Bank case has finally given the lower courts some tools they could use to overturn obvious and vague patents, particularly frivolous patents on software. But we haven't won, because bogus patent suits are still being filed. This talk is for anyone who is wondering what the recent decisions mean for small and mid-size entities, how international treaties can impact local policy and what can be done to improve the situation.
Business 2016-04-13 17:05:45 +0000
Deb Nicholson

* You Can’t Make Money in Open Source…?

Open source is an incredibly powerful engine for great software, but not so much for making money. Or so they say.
Business 2016-04-13 06:14:09 +0000
Justin Dunham