Schedule

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Tuesday, June 21, 2016

8:00am

  • Registration Opens
    • Title: Registration Opens
    • Time: 8:00am

9:009:45am

    • Title: Free Culture in an Expensive World
    • Track: Business
    • Room: Sanctuary
    • Time: 9:009:45am
    • Excerpt:

      Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. We’ll talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so. The heart of this talk will be a series of case studies based on interviews with community members covering various economic models for open source, including worker co-ops, grant-funded and academic projects, for-profit business models, crowdfunding campaigns, and all-volunteer projects. We’ll explore the sustainability of each model as well as how they deal with the social pressures outlined in the first part of the talk.

    • Speakers: Shauna Gordon-McKeon

9:4510:00am

  • Coffee Break
    • Title: Coffee Break
    • Time: 9:4510:00am

10:0010:45am

10:0011:45am

    • Title: Sparkle security
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B201
    • Time: 10:0011:45am
    • Excerpt:

      “Agent Sparkle, you have been recruited as a security expert to use your skills to protect the kingdom of Project Rainbow. You might not feel qualified yet, but Project Rainbow has great faith in your ability to learn.” Web security is perhaps one of most fun types of computer security to master: exploits can be constructed quickly and without many tools. But sadly, while there are many tutorials, they simply don’t have enough rainbows and sparkles and the practice exploits tend to focus on the basics without flourishes. Project Sparkle is a set of “training missions” designed to make learning web security more kid-friendly, but we think the audience of Open Source Bridge will also enjoy exploiting the web to add more rainbows and sparkles!

    • Speakers: Terri Oda
    • Title: Supporting diversity with a new approach to software
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B302/303
    • Time: 10:0011:45am
    • Excerpt:

      It’s time for a new approach to software, one that embraces differences (not just tolerates them), and sees diversity as a strength. The industry is primed for change, and there are huge opportunities to do better by valuing emotion, intuition, compassion, purpose, empowerment, sustainability, and social justice. This highly-interactive session includes discussions of current “best practices” and emerging ideas from projects that have focused heavily on diversity, issues and problems in today’s environment, imagining how things could be different, and figuring out concrete steps to make it happen.

    • Speakers: Jon Pincus, Tammarrian Rogers

11:0011:45am

Noon1:30pm

  • Lunch
    • Title: Lunch
    • Time: Noon1:30pm

1:302:15pm

2:303:15pm

3:153:45pm

  • Afternoon Tea
    • Title: Afternoon Tea
    • Time: 3:153:45pm

3:454:30pm

3:455:30pm

4:455:30pm

    • Title: The Rise of Emoji
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B201
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      Emoji is taking over the Web! We will look at how the phenomenon of Emoji has taken the Web by storm, explore how people are using Emoji on their favorite platforms and implications. We will also examine how these online platforms are benefiting from Emoji.

    • Speakers: Alolita Sharma
  • * Type Theory 101 B202/203
    • Title: Type Theory 101
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B202/203
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      Have you heard about type theory and always wanted to understand the principles behind it, but always thought it was too complicated since it has a lot of Lambda Calculus and algebras? This talk will approach these concepts in a friendly way.

    • Speakers: Hanneli Tavante
    • Title: GDB: A Gentle Intro
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B204
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      We love Ruby for its elegance, its simplicity, its flexibility. But our favorite language perches atop a whole world of native code, and that other world occasionally intrudes.

    • Speakers: Jason Clark
    • Title: Free Culture, Free Software
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B301
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      I gave a similar talk at LibrePlanet 2015 and would like to reprise it with updated information on the current state of FOSS for Cultural Heritage. I’d like to discuss how to get involved with FOSS projects that are related to the Cultural Heritage space and what kinds of projects currently exist. I’ll end the session by talking about what kinds of projects could and should exist as well as community building and awareness in FOSS for Cultural Heritage Organizations.

    • Speakers: Jennie Rose Halperin
    • Title: Black Pipe Testing, or "@#$! Up Your App by Impersonating a Database"
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B302/303
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      A “black box” test sends input to your program and tests the output. But a networked application has I/O at two ends: the API and the network. A black box test can’t validate it, especially its error-handling. But a “black pipe” test can! Such a test talks to your code over the network at the same time as it tests the API. I’ll present a handy library for Black Pipe tests of MongoDB apps and advise you when to use it. I want you to write a library like it for your favorite DB, so we can all test our programs better!

    • Speakers: A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

5:457:30pm

5:456:30pm

  • * Great Asana! B202/203
    • Title: Great Asana!
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B202/203
    • Time: 5:456:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      Bring your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips, aching back, and busy mind and explore how Yoga can help bring you relief, rest, and focus. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.

      This class is accessible to all levels of ability.

    • Speakers: Sherri Koehler

5:3010:00pm

  • Hacker Lounge Open
    • Title: Hacker Lounge Open
    • Time: 5:3010:00pm
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Wednesday, June 22, 2016

9:009:45am

    • Title: Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: Sanctuary
    • Time: 9:009:45am
    • Excerpt:

      Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project.

      Inclusion takes on many forms in an open source project, including supporting contributors from all types of backgrounds, being empathetic to their project goals, and trusting them to take lead. As a mental health project, if me must also accommodate its contributors who face their own mental health challenges. All open source projects should do the same. Managing people is just as important as managing technical contributions in software.

    • Speakers: Julia Nguyen

9:4510:00am

  • Coffee Break
    • Title: Coffee Break
    • Time: 9:4510:00am

10:0010:45am

10:0011:45am

11:0011:45am

Noon1:30pm

  • Lunch
    • Title: Lunch
    • Time: Noon1:30pm

1:302:15pm

    • Title: Little Leaks Sink Your Tests
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B201
    • Time: 1:302:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      “The tests pass on my machine.” “Wait, it was working a minute ago.” “Oh, that test is flaky sometimes.” Unpredictable tests are toxic for our productivity. They undermine confidence in our code. They encourage us to wallpaper over the immediate problem, rather than fixing the underlying cause.

      In this presentation, we’ll talk about a chief cause of flaky tests: leaky global state.

    • Speakers: Ian Dees
    • Title: Taking no for an answer
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B202/203
    • Time: 1:302:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Open source (like many fields) rewards people who are confident and even a bit pushy. So we give talks encouraging folk to get over imposter syndrome, lean in, say yes to more things. But self-improvement shouldn’t focus only on our most vulnerable members, but also our most powerful. So let’s talk not about saying yes, but about hearing no. Learning to take no for an answer can transform efforts such as security, diversity and mentoring where we have few experts or volunteers and great need. Let’s talk about accepting “defeat” with grace, and how to take “no” for an answer while still moving forwards.

    • Speakers: Terri Oda
    • Title: 5 Years of WordCamps: Growth, Automation, and Lessons Learned
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B204
    • Time: 1:302:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      The number of WordCamps (volunteer-organized WordPress conferences) has nearly doubled since 2011. Find out how we’ve improved the WordCamp attendee experience while at the same time improving the experience of our volunteer organizers, through a combination of institutional support and community involvement, plus what problems we hope to solve in the years to come.

    • Speakers: Andrea Middleton
    • Title: Pulling up Your Legacy App by its Bootstraps!
    • Track: Hacks
    • Room: B301
    • Time: 1:302:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to support an application built on an older framework. What would you do if changing the code broke everything? The application functionality is too large to be replaced in one release. What can you do? You can bootstrap it, replacing the application in sections as time allows. When all functionality is replaced, you can put your new codebase into a newer framework or a standalone application.

    • Speakers: Emily Stamey
    • Title: An Ensemble of Programming Languages: How to Build a Platform for Collaboration
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B304
    • Time: 1:302:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      The era of “general-purpose programming languages” is nearing its end. The cost of building a programming language and integrating it with other languages has fallen significantly, but our approach to building programming languages has not changed substantially in decades. The consequence is an enormous financial cost paid, in terms of real dollars as well as in hours of programmer effort. The solution is not yet another “better” general-purpose language but rather a platform that prioritizes a collaborating assortment of specialized languages that together perform well in a specific context: an ensemble of programming languages.

    • Speakers: Brian Shirai

2:303:15pm

    • Title: Tightly coupling your (REST) API docs
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B201
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Documenting REST APIs isn’t easy, and we need practical tips and tricks for keeping docs in sync with design and implementation. This talk explores some different but related ways to accomplish the goals of user-friendly, always up-to-date API docs.

    • Speakers: Jennifer Rondeau
    • Title: More Than Binary: Inclusive Gender Collection and You
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B202/203
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Many people identify their gender in many ways. So why do we build systems to capture accurate gender information with a dropdown that only lists “male” and “female”?
      This talk covers why you might want to consider alternative ways of selecting gender for your users, a brief overview of the current best practices, the case study of the decisions I made when creating my open source project Gender Amender (a library you can help work on right now!), and why more work needs to be done. I’d also like to facilitate a short discussion during the time slot, so that we can share varied perspectives on how to improve the entire process of gender collection, and articulate the lenses through which we can and should view gender (e.g. “what are some other data structures we could use to capture gender identity information?”).

    • Speakers: Anne DeCusatis
    • Title: A programmers guide to Music.
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B204
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Imagine a place where Ruby meets Music, its called MAGIC LAND.

      Music is not a lot different from programming. In this talk we will see how.
      I will talk about this amazing piece of open-source software called SonicPi. SonicPi is a new kind of musical instrument. Think about it, you write code to make music. And it gets even better, code is written in a ruby DSL. Also I will talk about notes, samples, synth and other musical things SonicPi lets us do it.

      Don’t worry if do not get these terms. When I started, I did not either. But at the end of the talk, you will know how to make music.

    • Speakers: Rishi Jain
    • Title: Monitoring Asynchronous Applications
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B302/303
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      The lure of asynchronous programming is that it will make your application run faster and your code simpler to reason about. So we have our wonderfully efficient non-blocking app; how do we check that it’s delivering the goods performance wise?

    • Speakers: Amy Boyle
    • Title: Security Starts With You: Social Engineering
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B304
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Virus? There’s an app for that. Malware? There’s an app for that. Social engineering? It’s a little more complicated. These techniques, used by hackers to gather information on their target, are hard to combat without education – so why don’t we talk about them more often? Aimed at the average user who could be targeted by such an attack, this talk discusses the tools of social engineering, how it can be combated and why so many companies fail in preparing their employees for such an attack.

    • Speakers: Tiberius Hefflin

3:153:45pm

  • Afternoon Tea
    • Title: Afternoon Tea
    • Time: 3:153:45pm

3:454:30pm

4:455:30pm

5:457:30pm

5:456:30pm

5:3010:00pm

  • Hacker Lounge Open
    • Title: Hacker Lounge Open
    • Time: 5:3010:00pm
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Thursday, June 23, 2016

9:009:45am

9:4510:00am

  • Coffee Break
    • Title: Coffee Break
    • Time: 9:4510:00am

10:0010:45am

10:0011:45am

11:0011:45am

Noon1:30pm

  • Lunch
    • Title: Lunch
    • Time: Noon1:30pm

1:302:15pm

2:303:15pm

    • Title: The Ability to Disable: Who Did You Forget When You Designed Your UI?
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B201
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      While the increased use of technology has in some ways improved the lives of those with disabilities, there is a gap that still needs to be filled. Uncaptioned or poorly captioned videos leave the deaf and hard of hearing community out of the loop, untagged photos leave blind users unaware of integral information, and poorly coded webpages are too much of a hassle for individuals using screen readers.

      But what if this was this was different? What if we thought about all of the potential users of our technology and developed programs intentionally allowing access for everyone? How could we make a programmer’s work truly inclusive, truly open to everyone?

      Experiential learning often provides those ‘a ha!’ moments, so together we’ll enjoy some mis-captioned videos, have a ‘listen-along’ to what a screen reader sounds like when a page is not coded correctly, and take a look at the end users’ experience when software is not programmed with a disabled audience in mind. Then, we’ll talk about what we can do to improve the current offerings and answer, “what next?”

    • Speakers: Rebecca Jennings
    • Title: Hogwarts is a Terrible Learning Environment: Discuss
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B202/203
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Like many young Muggles of the early 00’s, I dreamed of receiving my Hogwarts letter. But re-reading the series with an eye toward learning lessons about creating a positive learning environment, it’s clear that Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry contains some unfortunate lessons in what NOT to do. When it comes to crafting an environment that encourages asking questions, fosters cooperation, and ensuring the success of its developers — I mean, wizards — we can learn a lot from the mistakes of the Hogwarts faculty. In this magical talk, you’ll learn how to be a better mentor and help your workplace become a place where your junior developers can flourish.

    • Speakers: Lacey Williams Henschel
    • Title: Machine Learning 101: How to get started with Convolutional Neural Networks
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B204
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Machine learning and especially convolutional neural networks are on the rise. With the sheer limitless amount of data and cheap computation power, neural networks can now solve problems which have been fairly complex in the past. Cole and Hannes will demonstrate how you implement a convolutional neural network with a few lines of Python code to classify images, recognize voices or understand texts.

    • Speakers: Hannes Hapke, Cole Howard
    • Title: Open sourced tools for Agent Based Modeling
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B301
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Agent-based modeling is a technique used to explore both complexity and emergence by simulating individual actors and their actions inside of a system. Think of systems such as the traffic in the city or financial markets where one actor can have an effect on the decisions of others until the system’s direction changes its course. During this survey, you will gain an understanding of open source software available in a variety of languages and how to get started quickly.

    • Speakers: Jackie Kazil
    • Title: Corporate Open Source Fail
    • Track: Business
    • Room: B302/303
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to “do the right thing”?

    • Speakers: Sarah Sharp
    • Title: Generations of Open Source and what to do about it
    • Track: Business
    • Room: B304
    • Time: 2:303:15pm
    • Excerpt:

      Open source has moved from experimental to mainstream in the past 10 years, but has definitely changed the landscape in the last 15 years. Because of that, we have a few generations of people within the broader ecosystem, and they probably have no idea that all of these communities exist, much less the fact that there’s a whole ocean of a open source technology industry out there.

    • Speakers: Amye Scavarda

3:153:45pm

  • Afternoon Tea
    • Title: Afternoon Tea
    • Time: 3:153:45pm

3:454:30pm

    • Title: Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B202/203
    • Time: 3:454:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you’re a senior engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Besides, great mentors are critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.

    • Speakers: A. Jesse Jiryu Davis
    • Title: Why you can't afford to miss out on junior developers
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B204
    • Time: 3:454:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      What if your next hire could make your team faster, help create a more inclusive and diverse environment, be easy to find, and be super excited to work with you?

      These people are not unicorns, they’re junior developers. Most teams just don’t know how to bring them on and get these benefits. Whether you’re in a startup, consultancy, or a BigCo, with a few tips and processes, any team can learn how to grow new developers.

    • Speakers: Bracken Mosbacker
    • Title: Enabling Open Source Contributors at Puppet
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B301
    • Time: 3:454:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      As open source software developers and community maintainers, fostering an inclusive community and giving contributors the tools they need to succeed is incredibly important, but not always easy. This is especially true when you have a complex distributed codebase and contributors without a background in software development. Through our attempts to enable our contributors we’ve encountered many challenges and iterated on many solutions with varying levels of success. Our hope is that by sharing the stories of our successes and failures, as well as the lessons we learned, we can help other community maintainers lower the barrier to entry for contributors.

    • Speakers: Hailee Kenney, Morgan Rhodes
    • Title: Accessible By Default
    • Track: Practice
    • Room: B302/303
    • Time: 3:454:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      Making your website accessible for users with disabilities isn’t flashy, but it’s necessary. Websites built for universal access benefit all users, not just users with a disability. They’re also more SEO friendly, and are generally built to be more user friendly. From generating increased revenue, to providing better access to services, the benefits of developing accessible websites are real and measurable.

    • Speakers: Kendra Skeene
    • Title: Spelunking with ǝpoɔᴉu∩
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B304
    • Time: 3:454:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      What do a fistbump emoji, Mandarin Chinese, and rocket ships have in common? They’re all represented with entries in Unicode, the biggest, baddest, and most widely-used open standard. In this talk, we’ll explore the messy and conflicting ideas that humans call “text”, and how we represent those ideas in software.

    • Speakers: John Feminella

4:455:30pm

    • Title: Bots Not Cattle
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B201
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      “Cattle Not Pets” got us to the first generation of microservice infrastructures. Now it’s time for a second generation metaphor: “Bots Not Cattle.”

    • Speakers: Josh Berkus
    • Title: Wiping Away the (Bad) Lines in the Sand in the Software Developer Community
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B202/203
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      Think of a shibboleth as a proverbial line in the sand that determines who belongs and who is an outsider. There are a lot of arbitrary shibboleths in programming. Text editors (emacs vs. vim vs. sublime), paradigms (object-oriented vs. functional), languages (everyone vs Java), type systems, are all topics of… to put it lightly, “vigorous conversation.” In set theory terms, the developer community does not do enough to encourage seeing different developer groups as unions instead of intersections. To a newcomer, this situation sets up too much of a danger of alienation. If someone makes fun of the language that you use to learn how to code, then you’re less likely to want to keep learning.

    • Speakers: Wale O.
    • Title: Open source on Georgia's mind
    • Track: Business
    • Room: B204
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      The state of Georgia runs its web publishing platform using Drupal. This was the first open source implementation handled by any state at an enterprise level. Within a period of one year, the state needed to build a Drupal based platform and migrate 55 websites with new interface designs. This talk addresses the costs benefits Georgia saved by implementing open source and showcases some of the challenges and wins the state experienced while moving to open source.

    • Speakers: Nikhil Deshpande
    • Title: An Introduction to ClojureScript
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B301
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      ClojureScript is a fun, productive language that compiles to JavaScript. Though its syntax is a different its functional immutable nature lets you be productive when developing complex web applications.

    • Speakers: Julio Barros
    • Title: Postcards from the Edge Case: When One Size Doesn't Fit All
    • Track: Culture
    • Room: B302/303
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      For every average person that finds your product what they want, there is a person outside that average that wants to use your product. They might even be able to use your product, if there was a way to make it work for them. Outliers are useful for your design, if you harness them properly.

    • Speakers: Alex Byrne
    • Title: Distributed Consensus with Raft
    • Track: Theory
    • Room: B304
    • Time: 4:455:30pm
    • Excerpt:

      Getting people to agree to things is sometimes hard. But implementing consensus with computers is harder. And distributed consensus with computers is ​_really_​ hard. How do we do it? One answer: the distributed consensus algorithm known as Raft.

    • Speakers: John Feminella

5:456:30pm

5:308:00pm

  • Hacker Lounge Open
    • Title: Hacker Lounge Open
    • Time: 5:308:00pm

7:0011:00pm

  • Official Party
    • Title: Official Party
    • Time: 7:0011:00pm
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Friday, June 24, 2016

9:00am4:00pm

  • Unconference Day
    • Title: Unconference Day
    • Time: 9:00am4:00pm