B302/303

Sessions for this room

Tuesday, June 21 - 10:00 AM

* Supporting diversity with a new approach to software

It’s time for a new approach to software, one that embraces differences (not just tolerates them), and sees diversity as a strength. The industry is primed for change, and there are huge opportunities to do better by valuing emotion, intuition, compassion, purpose, empowerment, sustainability, and social justice. This highly-interactive session includes discussions of current “best practices” and emerging ideas from projects that have focused heavily on diversity, issues and problems in today’s environment, imagining how things could be different, and figuring out concrete steps to make it happen.
Theory
Jon Pincus, Tammarrian Rogers
Tuesday, June 21 - 01:30 PM

* Real World Docker

Let’s deep dive into how New Relic transformed itself to run on Docker.
Practice
Jason Clark
Tuesday, June 21 - 02:30 PM

* Digging through the logs

Okay, so now it's time for the really fun part: We've removed the duplicate rows from the log, now we need to only show the rows that contain something that *looks like* an IP address. To do this we'll use a search pattern. These patterns are written in Regular Expressions or RegEx. Like so many other tools in Linux they're immensely powerful but either don't work at all or go haywire with a single incorrect character. Let's write one that looks for a cluster of numbers, then a period, then another cluster of numbers.
Practice
Toby Fee
Tuesday, June 21 - 03:45 PM

* Yelling As A Service: Adventures in Unofficial QA

What goes into making a helpful bug report, if you're not even given access to the repository? Why should you, the user, report bugs? How do you navigate a series of gatekeepers who don't want to acknowledge your bugs? How do you maintain a good relationship with people in charge of a project that's screwing up your whole life?
Practice
Azure Lunatic
Tuesday, June 21 - 04:45 PM

* Black Pipe Testing, or "@#$! Up Your App by Impersonating a Database"

A “black box” test sends input to your program and tests the output. But a networked application has I/O at two ends: the API and the network. A black box test can’t validate it, especially its error-handling. But a “black pipe” test can! Such a test talks to your code over the network at the same time as it tests the API. I’ll present a handy library for Black Pipe tests of MongoDB apps and advise you when to use it. I want you to write a library like it for your favorite DB, so we can all test our programs better!
Practice
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis
Tuesday, June 21 - 05:45 PM

* Python setup help for "Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop"

This is an open session for people to get help setting up Python to prepare for the "Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop" longform session the next day.
Practice
Trey Hunner
Wednesday, June 22 - 10:00 AM

* Micro-services provide some benefits, but at what cost?

Several years ago, there was an architectural paradigm shift toward "micro-services" and away from the "monolithic" application stack. A micro-service architecture comes with scalability and replaceability, among others, but is it worth the time and effort to build it? Is it worth debugging API calls gone wrong? If you're thinking about making this move, have already started, or have already deployed to production, this is an ideal venue to see what others are doing with micro-services.
Theory
Serge Domkowski
Wednesday, June 22 - 11:00 AM

* Standardizing the Social Web - W3C #socialweb specs

The W3C Social Web Working Group has been developing standards to make it easier to build social applications in the open web. In this talk, you'll get an overview of the various specifications in development, (Activity Streams 2, Webmention, Micropub, and ActivityPub), to help you learn how each applies to the social web.
Theory
Aaron Parecki
Wednesday, June 22 - 01:30 PM

* Open Source is People

For those who want to do more than just code, this talk will show you 8 ways I have contributed without opening up Vim once.
Culture
Justin Dorfman
Wednesday, June 22 - 02:30 PM

* Monitoring Asynchronous Applications

The lure of asynchronous programming is that it will make your application run faster and your code simpler to reason about. So we have our wonderfully efficient non-blocking app; how do we check that it's delivering the goods performance wise?
Practice
Amy Boyle
Wednesday, June 22 - 03:45 PM

* Sustainable Career Development: Advancing While Still Having Free Time

In this talk, we'll examine the pressure in the tech industry to participate in work-related extracurriculars like side projects and meetups. We'll analyze where these expectations come from, what they're actually getting at, and talk about ideas for progressing in our careers without losing sight of the things in life that make us happy outside of work.
Culture
Noelle Daley
Wednesday, June 22 - 04:45 PM

* API Design Through the Lens of Photography

To be successful in photography and API design, you must first understand the constraints of the medium, both technical and non-technical. Learning how to work within constraints and finding your own style are critical to being a successful photographer and API designer.
Theory
Bryan Hughes
Thursday, June 23 - 10:00 AM

* Readable Regular Expressions: A Hands-On Workshop

What are regular expressions, what are they useful for, and why are they so hard to read? We'll learn what regular expressions are good for, how to make our own regular expressions, and how to make our regular expressions friendly and readable (yes it's possible... sometimes).
Practice
Trey Hunner
Thursday, June 23 - 01:30 PM

* The Folk Knowledge of Bugzilla

It's good to know if a bug is a regression, and if I want to mark a bug as a regression, there's a keyword for that. (searches on regression keyword.) But there's also a whiteboard tag for that (searches on whiteboard tags containing 'regression'.) Oh dear, and let me unique that out and there's how many ways to say "this is a regression." If you're a release manager, how do you find out what bugs may be regressions and that you want to follow up on with your engineering leads?
Practice
Emma Humphries
Thursday, June 23 - 02:30 PM

* Corporate Open Source Fail

What makes companies with good intentions fail so miserably at open source? How can we (as engineers and managers) influence our bosses to "do the right thing"?
Business
Sarah Sharp
Thursday, June 23 - 03:45 PM

* Accessible By Default

Making your website accessible for users with disabilities isn’t flashy, but it’s necessary. Websites built for universal access benefit all users, not just users with a disability. They’re also more SEO friendly, and are generally built to be more user friendly. From generating increased revenue, to providing better access to services, the benefits of developing accessible websites are real and measurable.
Practice
Kendra Skeene
Thursday, June 23 - 04:45 PM

* Postcards from the Edge Case: When One Size Doesn't Fit All

For every average person that finds your product what they want, there is a person outside that average that wants to use your product. They might even be able to use your product, if there was a way to make it work for them. Outliers are useful for your design, if you harness them properly.
Culture
Alex Byrne