Culture track

We want to know what special sauce you use for interpersonal insights!
What makes open technology and culture communities effective? Demonstrate how you motivate people to work together well. Example topics from the past include “’Why did you do that?’ You’re more automated than you think.” and “Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls.”

Sessions for this track

* A Pair Programming Workshop

Pair programming is a great way to collaborate on code and to share new ideas and techniques, but the social dynamics can be challenging. In this session, we'll talk about what works and what doesn't, and practice some techniques for better pairing!
Culture
Moss Collum, L Dean

* Aesthetics and the Evolution of Code

Elegance is an aesthetic experience. It’s about perfectly conforming to a set of imperfect standards, meeting a need with no extraneous lines or rough edges. Elegance in code is the result of a mysterious process, just as elegance in nature is— in the case of nature, the process is evolution.
Culture
Coraline Ada Ehmke

* Bringing non-technical people to the Free/Libre/Open world and why it matters

Software freedom advocates sometimes believe a myth of "trickle-down technology" — that open collaboration and freedom for programmers will somehow lead to more free and open technology for the rest of society. To build technology that truly empowers most people, we need more non-programmers actively involved in development. I'll share my story of how I started as a music teacher and became the co-founder of an ambitious Free/Libre/Open project. We'll discus lessons about outreach to others like me.
Culture
Aaron Wolf

* Bringing Security to Your Open Source Project

With high profile breaches in open source projects, the issue of security has become one of great import to many people. But many projects, especially smaller ones, are intimidated by the idea of a security audit. This talk will discuss ways for smaller projects to experiment, learn, and even have fun improving their security. No PhDs in security required!
Culture
Terri Oda

* Building and maintaining a healthy community

Open Source organizations and projects are driven by the strength of its community. We have often seen but how big communities fall because of wrong ways of handling it or mismanagements. My talk will be around the lines of how a community leader or manager can take a few extra responsibilities to keep a community healthy.
Culture
Priyanka Nag

* Building Diverse Social Networks

While only a handful of social networks like Dreamwidth and Quirell explicitly prioritize diversity, there are plenty of lessons to learn about what to do — and what not to do — from Facebook, Twitter, and others. Best practices include counter-oppressive politics, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Lynn Cyrin

* Building mentoring into an open source community that welcomes and values new contributors

This session will talk about how to integrate mentoring into all the different layers of an open source project. This involves a change in the whole community which treats new contributors with respect, knowing they have something valuable to contribute to the project.
Culture
Cathy Theys

* Calculating Guilt: Using open-source software in forensic DNA testing

DNA testing has become the "gold standard" of forensics, but linking an item of evidence to a person of interest isn't always clear cut. New open source tools allow DNA analysts to give statistical weight to evidentiary profiles that were previously unusable, letting juries weigh the evidence for themselves. This talk will discuss my lab's validation and implementation of the Lab Retriever software package for probabilistic genotyping.
Culture
Sarah Chenoweth

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture
Heidi Waterhouse

* Catalyzing Diversity: Practical Advice for Navigating Minority STEM Communities to Open Up Open Source

How can Open Source Software projects attract minorities? Come to learn practical strategies to implement your diversity goals into actionable outreach efforts. We will describe ways to tap into minority STEM communities that exist both online and in meatspace. The former include Tweet chats and hashtags used by people of color who are enthusiasts of science (like #BLACKandSTEM) and tech (like #LATISM). The live events include annual conferences of minority students and professionals such as the Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing.
Culture
Alberto Roca, Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Community Moderation: you can't always halt a flamewar with one raised eyebrow (but it rarely hurts to try)

Even in an email list, moderation isn't limited to setting the entire email list to require approval before messages are posted. You can create rules which reflect the culture you'd like to see, and call attention to ways that the community differs from that culture. You can point out when a particular post doesn't fit with that culture -- publicly or privately, whichever you think will do the most good. You can point out when a particular post exemplifies something great about the culture. You can point out particular rules that everyone needs to keep abiding by, without calling out a specific post. If a specific person, or a specific handful of people, have trouble with the rules, you could put them in particular on moderated posting for some time. If someone keeps breaking the rules, that person is a good candidate for being removed entirely. There are limits to what the rest of the community and the moderators should have to deal with, even though your project may choose to keep that as a last resort. Sometimes the problem can be solved by redirection. If the main email list is getting cluttered with off-topic posts, consider a just-for-fun or off-topic side list to divert threads to once they wander off code and into sports, kittens, beer, or knitting. It's easier to say "You shouldn't do that here" than "You shouldn't do that, period"; it's even easier to say "You shouldn't do that here, but it would be great right over there." And most of us could use a sports, kittens, beer, or knitting break every now and then.
Culture
Azure Lunatic

* Consequences of an Insightful Algorithm

We have ethical responsibilities when coding. We're able to extract remarkably precise intuitions about an individual. But do we have a right to know what they didn't consent to share, even when they willingly shared the data that leads us there? How do we mitigate against unintended outcomes? In this talk, we'll learn how to build in systematic empathy, integrate practices for examining how our code might harm individuals, and net consequences that can be better for everyone.
Culture
Carina C. Zona

* Desigining for Renaming

Renaming yourself is never easy. In Santa Clara County in the State of California, to file a petition to change one's name costs over $400, and may take six months or more. Then one must change one's name (and possibly one's gender marker) on the dozens of sites and services one uses. On many sites, that's easy, I go to preferences and edit my name. But then the site addresses me as "Mr. Emma Humphries," oh really? Other systems will correctly greet me as "Emma" when I log in. But still call me by $DEAD_NAME when they send an email. This brings us to the first best practice: When I change my name in one place, change it in all the places.
Culture
Emma Humphries

* Economics of Volunteer Labor: Three stories from Debian

What circumstances allow volunteer projects to flourish? This talk covers three examples in Debian, diving deep into the questions like whose permission is required, what technical background is needed, and more, to highlight lessons of that can help any open source community organize its activities to empower volunteers.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Fear Driven Development

Have you ever not made a much-needed change because you were afraid of breaking something? Caution is wise, but too much fear can leave even the most agile of software organizations with a crippling aversion to change. This talk will discuss what makes us scared, why it hurts us, and my experiences helping a team I managed get rid of some of our fears.
Culture
Ryan Kennedy

* Five years, 1000 students: The story of Open Source Comes to Campus

Since 2010, OpenHatch has been running workshops at college campuses, teaching undergrads how to get involved in open source. In 2015, we expect to reach over 500 students through 25 events. This talk presents how we've the scaled program over the years, how we've evolved our curriculum, and how you can get involved.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* For Love and For Money

Let’s talk about the work we want to do, the work we have to do, and how we might create systems that don’t continue to force bad choices between building community, technical work, and diversity activism.
Culture
Audrey Eschright

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* From the Unicorn’s Mouth: Stories of Managing Multiple Diverse Identities in Tech

We each have many critical facets to our identity-- race, gender, sexuality, class, health, and family background are just a handful of examples-- and the interaction between them can shape our lives more than any one factor alone. In this panel discussion, learn about intersectionality, and what the experiences of those living at the crossroads of different minority identities can teach us about what it takes to create a truly inclusive open source community.
Culture
Megan Baker, Thalida Noel, Nichole Burton, Lisa Sy

* GeekChoir 2015

In this session, we'll continue the grand Open Source Bridge tradition of learning how to increase team cohesion, identity, and collaboration through music, joining our voices (in our uniquely geeky way) in harmony.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Good Enough Voter Verification & Other Identity Architecture Schemes for Online Communities

This talk is a deep dive into considerations for Identity Architecture for online communities. It's most specifically applications for political action, civic engagement, or virtual nations. I'll talk about pragmatic solutions for voter verification using the state voter registration database, schemes for peer to peer authentication, offline/online identification, Impartial Identity Architecture to control conflict, and more. The discussion is high level and appropriate for beginners, but there will be links to code and big ideas.
Culture
Ele Mooney

* Hosting Events that the Whole Community Loves

So, you're responsible for a growing an open source community and you want to ensure it's a friendly place for newcomers and old-timers alike. You want to make sure everyone feels welcome and has access to a variety of events (both on and offline) with content that meets the needs of all of your user base from beginner to advanced. This talk will...
Culture
Meg Hartley

* Humanising Math and Physics on Computer Science

There are some myths around Science - it's boring, useless, difficult. Many of them are heard while we are young, and many people tend to take then for the entire life. Science is very important, specially on Computer Science and Engineering, for building the basis of our logical thinking.
Culture
Hanneli Tavante

* Learning and Knowing with Federated Wiki

@AlysonIndrunas RT @Bali_Maha's wonderful beautiful thoughtful #fedwiki succinct summary "it is a new approach to looking at knowledge we construct together"
Culture
Ward Cunningham

* Making the web fun again

When Geocities shut down, it did much more than delete a bunch of obnoxious dancing baby GIFs and Limp Bizkit MIDI files. It deleted the ability for people to easily create web sites, and learn how to be in complete control of the content and presentation they provide to their audience. To the economically and socially disenfranchised, it was a disaster that prevented countless people from learning programming. So we brought it back, and open sourced the entire thing (including our financial data). Leave your nostalgia at the door - let us show you our efforts to pave a better future for tech startups, the tech community, and the future of the web itself.
Culture
Kyle Drake, Victoria Wang

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Morning Keynote — Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Tech Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* Open source collaboration for tackling real world environmental problems

Public Lab is a two-part project -- an attempt at large-scale community environmental monitoring, AND a massively distributed R&D lab for inventing new monitoring techniques and equipment. The community has grown a lot over the past five years, and we are here to share stories of -- and welcome you to -- an emerging FOSS culture that spans hardware, software, data, community organizing, and advocacy.
Culture
Dana Bauer, Mathew Lippincott

* Opening Up The Current Open Source Blueprint

Accessibility, diversity, and open source holding itself accountable to its own standards of what it means to be an open community.
Culture
Stephanie Morillo

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Teaching and managing for technologists

After 15 years or so working as a programmer I made two big changes in my job: first I became a manager, then I started working with college students to help them learn to code. This is a personal story of why that has been some of the most challenging and rewarding work I've ever done.
Culture
Lennon Day-Reynolds

* The Graceful Exit: Approaches for Changing One's Role in an Open Community

Open culture communities are passionate, dedicated backed by people. What happens when those people need to change their roles within the community? I've played varied roles in open culture communities through the years. In this talk I'll go over what worked well and what I wish I had approached in a different way when my role needed to change.
Culture
Kate Chapman

* The Public Library As An (Almost) Open Source Institution

Your public library can be one of your best allies for creating, distributing, and promoting Open Source ideas and projects. They want to help - they just need to know how.
Culture
Alex Byrne

* Universal Web Design: How to create an awesome experience for *every* user

In this talk, I will describe how Universal Web Design principles can be easily applied to new or existing sites, how these principles will improve your users’ experience, and how Universal Web Design will save you time and money.
Culture
David Newton

* What is LocalWiki, and why is it so much fun? Let's edit it!

LocalWiki, a very friendly and inclusive cousin of Wikipedia, is a project hosting region-specific open-content wikis where a community can write about local topics in as much detail as they like. I've had a ton of fun with this recently, and I'd like to explain to you why you might like it too! We can work on some first edits together.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* What stuttering taught me about marketing - not your typical soft skills talk

Your weakness just might be your greatest strength.
Culture
Sharon Steed

* Why Relationships Matter in Community Building: Experiences from the Philippine Cultural Heritage Mapping Project

What makes a successful project? It's not only a solid idea, firm execution and attention to the numbers. It's also successfully building working relationships between community members. This presentation will explore how one of Wikimedia Philippines' biggest projects was successful in large part to how the organization engaged its participants, and ultimately how they have come to be part of the wider Filipino Wikimedia community.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Write It Down: Process Documentation from the Ground Up

The collective knowledge base of an organization can be difficult to crack. Some things have "always been done that way" but no one knows why. This talk will help to expose those undocumented corners of your project, and give you tools for writing process documentation for new contributors using lessons from Not-For-Profit organizations.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Yoga!

Accessible yoga for people of all levels, special attention given to yoga postures and breathing that you can do at your desk.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* You, Too, Can Contribute to Open Source!

Are you curious about contributing to Open Source but don't know where to start? Learn how we became Open Source contributors, most recently with Outreach Program internships with Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) and Mozilla. Come learn how you can get started too.
Culture
Jessica Canepa, Barbara Miller, Adam Okoye

Proposals for this track

* ...Because Community Development matters.

The focus of talk would be on two major things Called "Initiate" and "Impact". How to Initiate a Open source community? and How to create an Impact through a community? I would talk about the things that we should care to initiate Open source community. What are the problems you could face during setting up a community and how to solve that problems. What are the things you would have to do that would make an impact.
Culture 2015-03-07 12:30:30 +0000
Milap Bhojak

* 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started Programming

There's more to being a successful developer than simply being great at programming.
Culture 2015-02-03 05:55:25 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Alchemy and the Art of Software Development

The metaphors we choose impose constraints on our thinking. We’ve chosen a limited set of fields to define our mental constraints. But almost any domain of human knowledge contains a rich vocabulary of patterns, metaphors, and tenets that can inform our problem-solving capabilities...
Culture 2015-03-07 21:38:40 +0000
Coraline Ada Ehmke

* Alice and Bob Are Really Confused

Journalists, activists, artists, business owners and other fine folks in New York City are asked to install PGP. You won't believe what happens next.
Culture 2015-03-15 00:29:32 +0000
David Huerta

* Be Awesome To Each Other

Roundtable discussion to share tips and ideas that can be implemented for empowering everyone to (re-)build an inclusive, supportive tech culture.
Culture 2015-03-13 01:09:57 +0000
Cat Poole

* Bringing Open Source to the Federal Government

The story of how one federal agency decided to start living open source principles, built great tools, and attracted great developer talent.
Culture 2015-02-06 17:08:49 +0000
Bruce Arthur

* Building better users

killer app: built. but how do you make it engaging? one way to get there is a rich, intuitive API. enabling people who use your app to remix the data, to use you as a building block in bigger causes means they are more likely to use you again, next time. Make it intuitive and users can self-serve - preserving your time and enabling inter-user idea exchange: let stack overflow work for you!
Culture 2015-03-08 06:04:33 +0000
chris mccraw

* Community Management on Freenode

Joining a FOSS project's leadership is rewarding, but if you haven't participated in IRC channel administration before, the learning curve can be daunting. Come to this talk to learn from edunham's 3 years of community management on IRC, and hear about how to avoid committing a variety of humorous but embarrassing mistakes.
Culture 2015-03-15 00:11:24 +0000
E. Dunham

* Corporate Source vs. Open Source

Has Open Source sold out? Has the corporate world somehow managed to take over the soul of open source without anyone noticing? When did open source "projects" requiring hundreds of thousands of dollars to participate become a thing?! In this talk we'll explore this and what it means for the OSS community at large.
Culture 2015-03-10 20:18:07 +0000
John Coggeshall

* Creating an Open Source Community for Distributed Networking from Scratch

Creating a vibrant open source community is more art than science. One of the challenges for any community is healthy community participation and stickiness. In this session, Adam will share his experience building a user/developer community for an open source distributed networking project from scratch.
Culture 2015-03-04 00:16:14 +0000
Adam Johnson

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior Python engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Especially if you’re committed to diversity: mentorship is critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture 2015-03-08 02:48:41 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Engaging Nepali Kids with Free Software

Last year, I spent six months volunteering with a Nepali educational non-profit called Open Learning Exchange, which develops interactive educational activities for OLPC laptops used by students in elementary schools. During my talk, I will share my experience about what free software can do to provide better educational opportunities in these schools that lack resources and governmental support we take for granted.
Culture 2015-02-19 09:04:58 +0000
Martin Dluhoš

* Experiences Leading a User Group

This talk will walk through the timeline from when I first became involved as the organizer of a local user group, the good, the bad and where we are now. Not only will we look at my experience with the organizational aspect of leading a user group but also how group members can play an active and important role just as with an open source project.
Culture 2015-03-11 17:36:20 +0000
Chris Schaefer

* Failure for Fun and Profit!

Do you actually know how to deliberately acquire, sharpen, and retain a technical skill?
Culture 2015-02-19 18:17:27 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Geeks and the News Cycle

Large news entities - like Gawker and Huffington Post - that cater to casual and regular consumers get some of their most popular news stories from places like Reddit, Twitter, and HackerNews. Their news stories are sourced by the user generated content of these sites - the commons if you will - they digest them, and then profit from the advertising income. This talk will look into how this consumer-newsgiant-consumer dynamic treats the communities that it benefits from, how the 'merit' of news stories' ranking on popularity competition sites like reddit relate to the meritocracy in tech, and how people react to suddenly being at the center of a media storm.
Culture 2015-01-28 04:20:33 +0000
Simon Vansintjan

* Growing up; what’s a techie to do in their mid 30s to keep their career moving

In this session, I’ll share my journey from developer to evangelist to business development. You’ll learn how I got there, what I learned along the way, and what you should look for in order to determine when it makes sense to do a career transition.
Culture 2015-01-21 22:55:37 +0000
John Mertic

* Growing your open source project

Many open source software projects are interested in growing their user and contributor bases, but it can be hard to know where to start. This workshop will cover a number of steps projects can take to be more welcoming. Participants will work through a variety of structured, hands-on activities.
Culture 2015-03-05 03:12:34 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Hosting a Mini Workshops for Local User Groups

Discussion about how to both learn and host a mini-workshop for your local computer user group. Includes an actual walk-through a mini-workshop of SQL-interaction library.
Culture 2015-03-06 20:30:25 +0000
Howard Abrams

* How to Get a Software Job without Experience

Getting your first job is a Catch-22: to get a job, you need experience; to get experience, you need a job. Or do you?
Culture 2015-03-05 04:48:38 +0000
Charles Anderson

* How to Get People to Do Things (of their Own Free Will)

What’s the secret to getting people to do things? This presentation will provide interesting, useful, and 100% ethical tools and perspectives.
Culture 2015-03-08 03:36:39 +0000
Maggie Starr

* maintaining sanity

an exploration of how i (failed?) to maintain several dozen foss projects, while maintaining my sanity
Culture 2015-03-06 15:46:49 +0000
Igor Galić

* MOOC, LMS, and Other Acronyms in Education

One-hundred sixty thousand students signed up for the Stanford AI course. I use the phrase "the Stanford AI Course" because it is the one my colleagues use. In 2011, when Professors Sebasian Thrun and Peter Norvig taught their course on artificial intelligence online, open to any English speaker with an adaquate internet connection, they taught the first successful Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). Stanford, however, was far from the first to offer online courses, but those are talked about significantly less. In the mid-2000s, as an undergrad, I took a medical ethics course Carnegie Mellon was teaching under their Open Learning Initiative. The OLI, which was first funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in 2001, created a system for creating, hosting, and taking courses online. This was around the same time the same foundation also funded MIT's OpenCourseWare (disclosure, I used to work there). MITOCW, among other things, helped to set the Creative Commons Atribution Non-Commercial Share Alike (CC-BY-NC-SA) as a standard among open education resources.
Culture 2015-03-07 16:27:50 +0000
Molly de Blanc

* Objectivity is a Myth: Your Data is Not Objective and Neither Are You

Data is often treated as an impartial representation of reality--an unbiased delivery mechanism for "ground truth". Data collection, however, is designed by people, whose knowledge and beliefs influence the design decisions they make. How does that impact what we think we know, and how can we adapt our processes to account for it?
Culture 2015-03-08 01:37:51 +0000
Rachel Shadoan

* Onboarding and Mentoring Apprentices

Our work, industry, and culture can benefit from bringing fresh eyes into engineering. I’ve personally heard from many industry veterans that they want to mentor new engineers, but don’t know how to initiate a program or convince an organization that Apprentice engineers will add value to a team. Mentoring is rewarding for the apprentice and the Mentor, and a good mentor is critical for helping new engineers succeed.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:53:31 +0000
Mercedes Coyle

* Open Power: Electoral Reform and Public Empowerment

“When we relate and share knowledge authentically, this places us in a state of grace, a state of 'win-win' harmony with all others, and establishes trust among all.” “The bottom line is that our government is not intelligent about how it pursues the public interest, because its decisions are not informed decisions (and its interest is generally not the public's).” “I realized in 1988 that my life as a spy specializing in secrets was not only unproductive, it was in sharp opposition to what we actually need: full access to true information, and consequently, the ability to create Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT).”
Culture 2015-01-20 14:59:38 +0000
Robert David Steele

* Patches: Stories of Open Source

Open source software is awesome. It provides the tools for our jobs, our hobbies, and our dreams. And anyone can contribute! Despite that openness, though, I hesitated for years before getting involved.
Culture 2015-01-17 00:36:36 +0000
Jason Clark

* Sharing Economy: Setting the foundation of the future economy

Sharing Economy has the potential to move the world towards sustainability and circular design. But what if we get it wrong? What if we the people don't participate in setting and maintaining the foundation of this future economy?
Culture 2015-01-27 11:03:11 +0000
aleksandr tsukanov

* Speaking for Non-Speakers

Many conference attendees come year after year without giving presentations. The sense that there's a high bar for perfection is pervasive, and people are afraid of being "wrong." Everyone has a story to tell about a problem they've solved or issues they've tackled. Learn how to share your experiences without fear, and join the speaker community!
Culture 2015-02-10 00:58:26 +0000
Kirsten Hunter

* Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Developer

You’ve been programming for a while now. You’re beginning to feel that you’ve got a handle on things but at the same time can’t escape the feeling that you’ve somehow plateaued in your growth as a software developer. In this talk Yitzchok, a rabbinic scholar and software developer, shares the “wisdom of the sages” as practical, actionable advice – strategies and tactics – that you can use to reinvigorate your growth as a software developer.
Culture 2015-02-27 16:41:28 +0000
Yitzchok Willroth

* Teaching Middle School to Program

This past year, I started an experiment and took a different approach to teaching middle school students how to program: Nothing. And you can do nothing too!
Culture 2015-02-07 04:24:27 +0000
Howard Abrams

* The Dead Language Fallacy

Our precious programming languages are being struck with a plague. Each year another language is declared dead or dying. But is that true or simply the tech equivalent of tabloid reporting?
Culture 2015-03-07 21:17:21 +0000
VM Brasseur

* The Ethics Of Software Development

The software we build has an impact on millions of people, and while it can be empowering for many, it is often disempowering for many others. Many times we as developers don't really think through these issues, and that is really a shame because the work we do has enormous impact on people's lives, and that impact is very often in opposition to a lot of the values that we hold dear. This session will talk through some of these issues, and explain why it is so important that we think about how we affect the world, and try to frame our work in a way that meshes well with our own values.
Culture 2015-02-18 19:42:28 +0000
Greg Dunlap

* The Psychology of Open Communities

Open source software may be made of ones and zeroes, but open source communities are made of people. This talk is a whirlwind tour of what research psychology has to tell us about how individuals and groups learn, falter, and grow. The talk will emphasize "takeaways" - ways for you to use this research to improve your communities and your experiences in them.
Culture 2015-03-04 22:52:09 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* User Style Zen: Balancing Standarization, Customization, and Accessibility

More and more, social media sites are allowing users to customize and style their own profiles and pages. On one hand, this lets people show their individuality and make their mark on their content. On the other, it presents problems for developers who want to make these options available, but have to balance that with site security and usability.
Culture 2015-03-08 04:38:46 +0000
Ruth Hatch

* What Can Software Teams Learn from Square Dancing?

In this talk, I’ll demonstrate things I've learned from square dancing that I’ve found applicable to software development, sometimes in surprising ways. These lessons can help us all write better software and have a better time doing it!
Culture 2015-03-08 03:53:19 +0000
L Dean

* Why you need a code of conduct

A code of conduct is a basic set of rules so everyone knows the behavioral expectations in a group. There are codes of conducts almost everywhere, from meetup groups to college campuses, even places of work have codes of conduct.
Culture 2015-03-13 05:53:03 +0000
Ariel Spear