B201

Sessions for this room

Tuesday, June 23 - 11:00 AM

* Monads Made Semi-Understandable

The word monad is all around us. I've heard long explanations of it that seem to over complicate it or make it intimidating. At Hacker School one of my goals was to learn some category theory, and understand the beast. I finally got it, and it wasn't so bad. I wanted to explain monads in a way that would not intimidate people and that would so some solid examples so if they felt like i had before, I might be able to help.
Hacks
libby kent
Tuesday, June 23 - 01:30 PM

* Project Fear

Project fear, not dissimilar to imposter syndrome, tends to affect all project leaders at some point (or many points) in their career. This session will tackle project fear by fully defining it, investigating its roots, noting its symptoms, and ultimately discussing a number of successful coping mechanisms.
Business
Adam Edgerton
Tuesday, June 23 - 02:30 PM

* Cat-herd's Crook: Enforcing Standards in 10 Programming Languages

At MongoDB we write open source database drivers in ten programming languages. Ideally, all behave the same. We also help developers in the MongoDB community replicate our libraries’ behavior in even more (and more exotic) languages. How can we herd these cats along the same track? For years we failed, but we’ve recently gained momentum on standardizing our libraries. Testable, machine-readable specs prove which code conforms and which does not.
Cooking
Samantha Ritter, A. Jesse Jiryu Davis
Tuesday, June 23 - 03:45 PM

* The Graceful Exit: Approaches for Changing One's Role in an Open Community

Open culture communities are passionate, dedicated backed by people. What happens when those people need to change their roles within the community? I've played varied roles in open culture communities through the years. In this talk I'll go over what worked well and what I wish I had approached in a different way when my role needed to change.
Culture
Kate Chapman
Tuesday, June 23 - 04:45 PM

* Building mentoring into an open source community that welcomes and values new contributors

This session will talk about how to integrate mentoring into all the different layers of an open source project. This involves a change in the whole community which treats new contributors with respect, knowing they have something valuable to contribute to the project.
Culture
Cathy Theys
Wednesday, June 24 - 10:00 AM

* Good Enough Voter Verification & Other Identity Architecture Schemes for Online Communities

This talk is a deep dive into considerations for Identity Architecture for online communities. It's most specifically applications for political action, civic engagement, or virtual nations. I'll talk about pragmatic solutions for voter verification using the state voter registration database, schemes for peer to peer authentication, offline/online identification, Impartial Identity Architecture to control conflict, and more. The discussion is high level and appropriate for beginners, but there will be links to code and big ideas.
Culture
Ele Mooney
Wednesday, June 24 - 01:30 PM

* How Do Python Coroutines Work?

Asynchronous I/O frameworks like Node, Twisted, Tornado, and Python 3.4’s new “asyncio” can efficiently scale past tens of thousands of concurrent connections. But async coding with callbacks is painful and error-prone. Programmers increasingly use coroutines in place of callbacks to get the best of both worlds: efficiency plus a natural and robust coding style. I’ll explain how asyncio’s coroutines work. They are built using Python generators, the “yield from” statement, and the Future and Task classes. You will gain a deep understanding of this miraculous new programming idiom in the Python standard library.
Chemistry
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis
Wednesday, June 24 - 02:30 PM

* How the Internet Works

The Internet runs the world; it connects our devices, powers our businesses, and even talks to our thermostats. But how does it all happen? We will follow an adventurous young web browser from the moment a hapless user presses "enter" and witness the trials and tribulations of many packets. Ride alongside the most fearsome syscalls as we learn how the Internet works!
Chemistry
Noah Kantrowitz
Wednesday, June 24 - 03:45 PM

* Teaching and managing for technologists

After 15 years or so working as a programmer I made two big changes in my job: first I became a manager, then I started working with college students to help them learn to code. This is a personal story of why that has been some of the most challenging and rewarding work I've ever done.
Culture
Lennon Day-Reynolds
Wednesday, June 24 - 04:45 PM

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking
Kirsten Hunter
Thursday, June 25 - 10:00 AM

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry
Kerri Miller
Thursday, June 25 - 11:00 AM

* The Open Source Writing Stack

Open source makes writing and publishing much easier both online and in print — provided you know what tools to use. This talk covers those tools (from LaTeX to WordPress) and how to choose between them.
Hacks
Thursday Bram
Thursday, June 25 - 01:30 PM

* Internet of Things Militia: Paramilitary Training for your IoT devices

Security folk generally talk about how the Internet of Things is bad for security, but it also brings new sensors and connected devices that could co-operate in new and interesting ways. Could we use internet things to enhance security?
Hacks
Terri Oda
Thursday, June 25 - 02:30 PM

* From the Unicorn’s Mouth: Stories of Managing Multiple Diverse Identities in Tech

We each have many critical facets to our identity-- race, gender, sexuality, class, health, and family background are just a handful of examples-- and the interaction between them can shape our lives more than any one factor alone. In this panel discussion, learn about intersectionality, and what the experiences of those living at the crossroads of different minority identities can teach us about what it takes to create a truly inclusive open source community.
Culture
Megan Baker, Thalida Noel, Nichole Burton, Lisa Sy
Thursday, June 25 - 03:45 PM

* Open Source Tools of the Hardware Hacking Trade

Many embedded systems contain design flaws that could lead to exploitable vulnerabilities. In order to discover such flaws, hackers and engineers use a specific set of tools. In this session, Joe will discuss his favorite open source hardware hacking and reverse engineering tools, including those that monitor/decode digital communications, extract firmware, inject/spoof data, and identify/connect to debug interfaces.
Cooking
Joe Grand
Thursday, June 25 - 04:45 PM

* Open Source Tools for Scientific Research

Come learn about open science and the tools available for modern scientific research.
Chemistry
Amy Boyle