Open Source Bridge 2015 proposals

Open Source Bridge is accepting proposals for our 2015 conference, which will take place June 23–26 in Portland, OR.

Sort by: Title, Track, Submission date

* JavaScript and Internet Controlled Hardware Prototyping

In this session we'll be exploring how to build rapid hardware prototypes using wifi and bluetooth low energy enabled Arduino boards, all controlled through JavaScript and API data, to allow for innovative, web enabled, software to hardware development techniques.
Hacks 2015-01-29 20:45:21 +0000
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Building a Mobile Location Aware System with Beacons

What if instead of a broad location, you could have pinpoint location awareness of someone in a physical space. How could this change everything about how we interact with the physical world? In this session we will be exploring Beacon technology, which enables this, the underlying Bluetooth Smart standard, and how we can use these systems to change everything from shopping, to accessibility for the disabled, all built on top of a mobile device.
Hacks 2015-01-29 20:43:23 +0000
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal, social, cultural, and gender identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking 2015-01-29 20:21:54 +0000
Nick Patch

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior Python engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Especially if you’re committed to diversity: mentorship is critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture 2015-01-28 20:28:29 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Geeks and the News Cycle

Large news entities - like Gawker and Huffington Post - that cater to casual and regular consumers get some of their juiciest news stories from places like Reddit, Twitter, and HackerNews. They let their news stories be sourced by the masses, and then cash in on the sweet sweet advertising money. How does this consumer-newsgiant-consumer dynamic treat the communities that it benefits from? How does the 'merit' of news stories ranking on popularity competition sites like reddit relate to the meritocracy in tech? How do people react to suddenly being at the center of a media storm?
Culture 2015-01-28 04:20:33 +0000
Simon Vansintjan

* Performance Testing Crash Course

Take back an understanding of how to automate performance and load testing and evaluate the impact it has on performance and your business.
Cooking 2015-01-28 03:29:29 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* Sharing Economy: Setting the foundation of the future economy

Sharing Economy has the potential to move the world towards sustainability and circular design. But what if we get it wrong? What if we the people don't participate in setting and maintaining the foundation of this future economy?
Culture 2015-01-27 11:03:11 +0000
aleksandr tsukanov

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry 2015-01-27 06:30:00 +0000
Denise Paolucci

* Open Source Hardware for Community Science

Closed-source scientific instrumentation doesn't work for community science. It's too expensive, too precise and delicate, and can't be repaired or rebuilt easily. Open-source hardware allows for a means of creating massive deployments of sensing systems, and pulling their data outputs together. This is the wave of the future.
Chemistry 2015-01-23 20:30:56 +0000
Pete Marchetto

* Bridging the Digital Divide with SMS Bots

We all know about Twitter and IRC bots, but with about 4/5 of people worldwide without smartphones SMS has the potential to reach those left behind the digital divide. We will discuss the various methods for developing an SMS bot, the legal and ethical implications of doing so, and we will build an SMS bot live.
Cooking 2015-01-23 19:15:56 +0000
Briar Schreiber

* Distribute all the things! - a primer for distributed systems in Go

In this talk I discuss how the features of the Go programming language make it quick and easy to build high-performance distributed systems. Go's specialized primitives, such as channels and goroutines, are instrumental in the language's ability to achieve concurrency. These primitives and common concurrency patterns are covered in this talk, along with a discussion on the challenges of building distributed systems.
Cooking 2015-01-23 17:09:46 +0000
Georgi Knox

* Roll Your Own Platform as a Service with Docker

What Are a Platform’s Components? * Builders/Packagers that create a deployable artifact * Artifact repositories to hold the deployable artifact * Provisioners that spin-up new services * Hosts that run a deployable artifact * Routers/Load balancers to * Direct traffic from the public to their nearest/most available application servers * Load-balancers/reverse-proxies/service discovery to * Route traffic from an application server to composing services * Slowly ramp-up load as a new version of a service is deployed
Hacks 2015-01-22 19:12:45 +0000
Zee Spencer

* A Crash Course In Reactive Programming with Play Framework

Let's build a sample application using reactive programming principles and the Play Framework along with AngularJS.
Chemistry 2015-01-22 15:52:48 +0000
Michael Pigg

* Using Asterisk to Stop Robocallers

Robocallers are very annoying. Even when the Do Not Call list works, it doesn't cover all robo callers. This talk is about combining Asterisk (an open source PBX) running on a BeagleBone and some inexpensive hardware to really stop these annoying callers.
Cooking 2015-01-22 15:41:21 +0000
Michael Pigg

* Growing up; what’s a techie to do in their mid 30s to keep their career moving

In this session, I’ll share my journey from developer to evangelist to business development. You’ll learn how I got there, what I learned along the way, and what you should look for in order to determine when it makes sense to do a career transition.
Culture 2015-01-21 22:55:37 +0000
John Mertic

* Thinking big picture; the vernacular for today’s buyer

In Thinking Big Picture, I’ll describe how to better engage your prospects, tell your story, and leave buyers with confidence in your ability to deliver. You’ll walk away with strategies for better positioning your product and executing on key big picture strategies -- without a huge pre-sales team.
Business 2015-01-21 22:54:48 +0000
John Mertic

* A hitchhikers guide to the cloud, or anywhere else your customer might want your app

In this talk, I’ll explore how a customer experiences the go live process, and how you as a vendor need to rethink the definition of a successful deployment in today’s complex deployment world.
Business 2015-01-21 22:53:55 +0000
John Mertic

* Test-Builder and beyond

Test-Builder, the foundation upon which Test-More, Test-Simple, and just about any other Test-Package are built, is getting new internals. Test-Builder and its internals are nearly 10 years old, and they are showing their age. It has been known for some time that things would have to change eventually. A few years back Schwern launched the Test-Builder 2 project. This effort ultimately failed to reach adoption. However a recent change, which simply modified a comment, managed to break Moose and other related packages, we simply can't sit around and let such things continue to happen.
Chemistry 2015-01-21 22:52:18 +0000
Chad Granum

* The End of JS Frameworks: ES6 and Web Components

JavaScript has a long history of being difficult to structure and maintain. To deal with this complexity a swath of frameworks have emerged over the years. At a glacial pace we have seen the web improve and those changes are ubiquitous now. ES6 and web components are happening! Come to this talk to learn how to get started with vanilla web platform code.
Hacks 2015-01-21 19:16:48 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* Create your Making Money Machine

No, it's not a BitCoin mining machine. See what kind of vending machine you can create using open hardware and FOSS
Hacks 2015-01-20 17:29:20 +0000
Jeff Prestes

* Open Power: Electoral Reform and Public Empowerment

“When we relate and share knowledge authentically, this places us in a state of grace, a state of 'win-win' harmony with all others, and establishes trust among all.” “The bottom line is that our government is not intelligent about how it pursues the public interest, because its decisions are not informed decisions (and its interest is generally not the public's).” “I realized in 1988 that my life as a spy specializing in secrets was not only unproductive, it was in sharp opposition to what we actually need: full access to true information, and consequently, the ability to create Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT).”
Culture 2015-01-20 14:59:38 +0000
Robert David Steele

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture 2015-01-20 03:37:15 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* 90 writing tips in 45 minutes

* Don't start with a blank page * Keep a map of your resources
Hacks 2015-01-20 02:50:35 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Numfar, do the dance of compatibility: moving languages forward without leaving users behind

Moving a language forward in backward incompatible ways is often necessary, but can be hard on users. In this talk, I'll compare and contrast approaches used to support older code bases in different languages, and look at what works and what doesn't.
Cooking 2015-01-20 00:53:35 +0000
Adam Harvey

* Welcome to the (home office) jungle

Working remotely can be great. It can also be terrible. All that freedom! All that flexibility! None of that pesky human contact! Of course, it's not all sunshine and roses (particularly that last one), and I'll be talking about how to balance remote work to get the most out of it.
Business 2015-01-20 00:50:16 +0000
Adam Harvey

* Get Your Shoes (Back) On!

Years ago the enigmatic Rubyist _why created Shoes, a tiny GUI toolkit for writing fun, simple applications in Ruby. Shoes served as the foundation for Hackety Hack, a programming environment specially designed to be accessible to kids.
Chemistry 2015-01-17 00:40:15 +0000
Jason Clark

* Homebrewing, Simple as Ruby

With a peculiar vocabulary, strict traditions, and heaps of arcane lore, brewing beer yourself can be overwhelming to the uninitiated… not unlike learning programming.
Hacks 2015-01-17 00:38:40 +0000
Jason Clark

* Patches: Stories of Open Source

Open source software is awesome. It provides the tools for our jobs, our hobbies, and our dreams. And anyone can contribute! Despite that openness, though, I hesitated for years before getting involved.
Culture 2015-01-17 00:36:36 +0000
Jason Clark

* Testing the Multiverse

It’s a basic principle of testing that minimizing dependencies will make you happier, faster, and more productive. But what happens when you can’t?
Cooking 2015-01-17 00:34:32 +0000
Jason Clark

* The Public Library As An (Almost) Open Source Institution

Your public library can be one of your best allies for creating, distributing, and promoting Open Source ideas and projects. They want to help - they just need to know how.
Culture 2015-01-16 21:06:56 +0000
Alex Byrne

* Running Open Source Java Platforms in the Public Cloud

Running a single instance of anything is easy - but how do you configure platforms for clustered environment in the cloud? Learn how to effectively launch a fleet of clustered Java-based platforms in the cloud, with or without containers, and carry that knowledge to run many others (WildFly, Spring Boot, Infinispan, and more).
Cooking 2015-01-16 18:25:50 +0000
Ray Tsang

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Business 2015-01-16 14:56:06 +0000
Ed Finkler

* An Introduction to Slim for PHP

Why is Slim cool? Because it gives you what you need to start an HTTP application, and then gets out of the way. It lets me use the components I want to use. It doesn't require any external dependencies. And it doesn't make me learn a whole bunch of framework-specific stuff that will be useless everywhere else. I like that. And I think you will too. This session will cover why you'd choose Slim, building a "hello world" app with just a few lines of code, how to integrate your favorite components, and scaling Slim up to the needs of larger apps.
Cooking 2015-01-16 14:52:46 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture 2015-01-16 14:48:40 +0000
Ed Finkler

* SlamData: SQL Isn't Just for RDBMS Anymore

NoSQL: the technology that everyone loves to hate on. Yet despite shaky formal foundations and horror stories of career-ending proportions, there's one thing I'm pretty sure of: NoSQL is here to stay. MongoDB is now the 4th most popular database of the world, and the company commercializing the open source database is valued at more than $1.6 billion dollars. For the longest time, the only way of accessing data in these NoSQL databases has been writing code: every database has its own API which lets you do various random things in sometimes very strange ways. That works for building applications, but it doesn't work for tooling, most specifically, for analytics and reporting. If you've ever tried to building a data processing workflow or some reporting machinery on top a NoSQL database, you know exactly what I'm talking about: it's painful, write-once, often buggy code you'll end up throwing away some day. What if there were another way? What if you could query databases like MongoDB as easily as MySQL? What if you could hook up standard open source database tools to MongoDB like Squirrel, and have things just work? Thanks to an open source project I've been working on for the past year and a half, I'm happy to say all these things are possible. ...
Chemistry 2015-01-15 14:26:59 +0000
John A. De Goe

* Building and maintaining a healthy community

Open Source organizations and projects are driven by the strength of its community. We have often seen but how big communities fall because of wrong ways of handling it or mismanagements. My talk will be around the lines of how a community leader or manager can take a few extra responsibilities to keep a community healthy.
Culture 2015-01-13 08:38:35 +0000
Priyanka Nag

* Mastering Bootstrap: how to get the most out of Bootstrap by writing modular CSS themes

Take Bootstrap to the next level by learning how to setup a development environment with harp.js, setup a Less variable and mixin library, make your theme modular, and deploy your theme for use on your projects or for sale on a marketplace.
Cooking 2015-01-11 08:36:42 +0000
Matt Lambert

* HTTP Can Do That?

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks 2015-01-10 00:57:34 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara