Open Source Bridge 2015 proposals

Open Source Bridge is accepting proposals for our 2015 conference, which will take place June 23–26 in Portland, OR.

Sort by: Title, Track, Submission date

* Probably

If you want to understand probability better (and you should), this is the talk for you.
Chemistry 2015-02-28 17:18:36 +0000
Bart Massey

* Talmudic Maxims to Maximize Your Growth as a Developer

"We work in an industry where the domain knowledge required to function at a high level is so vast and so fast changing that a Gladwellian 10,000 hours approach to its acquisition isn’t merely inefficient… it’s impossible. Really... who has time for that?! The single most effective way to accelerate the learning curve is to receive meaningful, timely, and personal guidance from someone who has trod that path before. Young craftsmen learn from journeymen, doctors serve as interns for many years before practicing on their own, professional golfers even have swing coaches; why should our discipline be any different? If you want to “level up” as a developer… advance your skills, accelerate your career… no matter where you’re holding today… nothing that you could possibly do will be more impactful than to apprentice yourself to a mentor that you can lean on and learn from..."
Culture 2015-02-27 16:41:28 +0000
coderabbi™ Willroth

* How Do Python Coroutines Work?

Asynchronous I/O frameworks like Node, Twisted, Tornado, and Python 3.4’s new “asyncio” can efficiently scale past tens of thousands of concurrent connections. But async coding with callbacks is painful and error-prone. Programmers increasingly use coroutines in place of callbacks to get the best of both worlds: efficiency plus a natural and robust coding style. I’ll explain how asyncio’s coroutines work. They are built using Python generators, the “yield from” statement, and the Future and Task classes. You will gain a deep understanding of this miraculous new programming idiom in the Python standard library.
Chemistry 2015-02-26 03:48:57 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Success is Bigger Than Not Failing: A passionate plea for criteria

We talk a lot about minimum viable products, and building our products up from small features. We talk a lot about failure, and how to learn from it and not replicate failures over and over again. But what I haven’t heard a lot of discussion about is how we know we’ve succeeded. Is it market share? Usable product? Could understanding and setting a measurable, achievable goals help us overcome imposter syndrome, second sock syndrome, and feature creep?
Hacks 2015-02-25 06:25:24 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* For Love and For Money

Let’s talk about the work we want to do, the work we have to do, and how we might create systems that don’t continue to force bad choices between building community, technical work, and diversity activism.
Culture 2015-02-25 04:41:08 +0000
Audrey Eschright

* Could Spambots Exist in Victorian England? and other questions about technology, society, and communication

As a tool for human communication, the internet has successes and failures. It allows us to meet people, collaborate, strengthen communities, and learn new things. It also enables oppression, harassment, and noise. These problems aren't new, but choices made in constructing the internet have often served to blindly facilitate their spread. Instead of continuing to assume that the technical, social, and economic constraints that kept such problems from destroying past systems will continue to hold, let's break down what's different from then to now, and find a new set of solutions.
Hacks 2015-02-25 04:35:16 +0000
Audrey Eschright

* Developing Fault-Tolerant Software With Your Favorite Programming Language

Fault-tolerance is more than handling unexpected signals, events and exceptions. It includes handling complete crashes gracefully along with memory corruption or invalid state that leads to crashes. All programmers are human and no actively developed source code can be completely perfect.
Cooking 2015-02-25 02:55:44 +0000
Michael Truog

* Why nobody cares about your GitHub project

Open source is hard. Everybody tells you to create a GitHub account and start throwing your code out there. Once you do, you realize that nobody really cares. In this talk, we'll see what you can do to increase the visibility of your work and how this can dramatically affect the quality of your project.
Chemistry 2015-02-24 15:16:27 +0000
Zeno Rocha

* Good Enough Voter Verification & Other Identity Architecture Schemes for Online Communities

This talk is a deep dive into considerations for Identity Architecture for online communities. It's most specifically applications for political action, civic engagement, or virtual nations. I'll talk about pragmatic solutions for voter verification using the state voter registration database, schemes for peer to peer authentication, offline/online identification, Impartial Identity Architecture to control conflict, and more. The discussion is high level and appropriate for beginners, but there will be links to code and big ideas.
Culture 2015-02-23 16:52:40 +0000
Ele Mooney

* View-first, and you can too.

In a world predominantly powered by MVC webapps, view-first web development provides a more designer and front-end developer friendly alternative to the convention. We'll look at how view-first development manifests itself in the Lift Web Framework, some of the benefits we get from it, and how that might translate into other languages and frameworks.
Cooking 2015-02-21 04:16:53 +0000
Matt Farmer

* Seamless Migration to Postgres RDS using Bucardo

This talk describes my experience with migrating Amazon EC2 Postgres instances over to RDS Postgres using Bucardo's Multi-master replication to migrate with minimal to no downtime.
Hacks 2015-02-20 19:33:08 +0000
David Kerr

* The Github Guitar: Your Mobile Browser as a Distributed Musical Instrument

Almost everyone has a smartphone, and the majority can run Chrome or Safari. Wouldn't it be great if we could use our mobile devices as tools to allow non-musicians in on the act of performing... by generating harmonious tones or presenting lyrics in time with musicians playing traditional instruments? What if we could synchronize multimedia events over dozens if not thousands of devices, simultaneously? Well, we can! The technology exists today, in your pocket. The singalong.js suite enables these types of ad-hoc musical collaborations in various combinations, in real time, with no perceptible latency, and without the use of a click track or other such draconian control system. The best thing is, it’s licensed under the GPL and uses lots of open libraries to make it happen.
Hacks 2015-02-20 19:07:29 +0000
Ross Brackett

* KDE : Journey of a Season of KDE student to Google Code In organisation administrator

The talk involves my journey as a SoK student in 2012 where I worked with KDE under KDE-educational game pairs, then as a Google Summer of Code student in 2013 with plasma team, emerging as a Google Code In 2013 mentor as well as administrator of Season of KDE 2014 as well as Google Code In 2014 for KDE organization. The talk also involves the changes in plasma so far from plasma 1 to plasma 5, how the code quality has improved with the upcoming plasma development and how to get involved with open source development.
Cooking 2015-02-20 05:35:25 +0000
Heena Mahour

* The Quantified Self in the Smart City: Geo-Visualizing the Open Data of YOU

How do we track ourselves and what does it mean for the places we live? What mapping tools can help us to quickly understand the data we're collecting?
Cooking 2015-02-19 20:01:01 +0000
Arlene Ducao

* Software Archeology and The Code Of Doom

You approach the legacy codebase with trepidation. If the vine-draped entrance and collapsing roof weren't enough warning, traces of previous explorers before you lie scattered about, caught in bizarre traps and oubliettes. What next, snakes?!
Chemistry 2015-02-19 18:18:46 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Failure for Fun and Profit!

Do you actually know how deliberately acquire, sharpen, and retain a technical skill?
Culture 2015-02-19 18:17:27 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Engaging Nepali Kids with Free Software

Last year, I spent six months volunteering with a Nepali educational non-profit called Open Learning Exchange, which develops interactive educational activities for OLPC laptops used by students in elementary schools. During my talk, I will share my experience about what free software can do to provide better educational opportunities in these schools that lack resources and governmental support we take for granted.
Culture 2015-02-19 09:04:58 +0000
Martin Dluhoš

* The Ethics Of Software Development

The software we build has an impact on millions of people, and while it can be empowering for many, it is often disempowering for many others. Many times we as developers don't really think through these issues, and that is really a shame because the work we do has enormous impact on people's lives, and that impact is very often in opposition to a lot of the values that we hold dear. This session will talk through some of these issues, and explain why it is so important that we think about how we affect the world, and try to frame our work in a way that meshes well with our own values.
Culture 2015-02-18 19:42:28 +0000
Greg Dunlap

* Calculating Guilt: Using open-source software in forensic DNA testing

DNA testing has become the "gold standard" of forensics, but linking an item of evidence to a person of interest isn't always clear cut. New open source tools allow DNA analysts to give statistical weight to evidentiary profiles that were previously unusable, letting juries weigh the evidence for themselves. This talk will discuss my lab's validation and implementation of the Lab Retriever software package for probabilistic genotyping.
Culture 2015-02-18 03:13:47 +0000
Sarah Chenoweth

* Lightweight Openstack Benchmarking Service with Rally and Docker

Benchmark OpenStack Cloud
Cooking 2015-02-17 11:53:24 +0000
Swapnil Kulkarni

* Essential DevStack

OpenStack Development Demystified
Cooking 2015-02-17 11:49:54 +0000
Swapnil Kulkarni

* A Matter of Time

Did you know that every so often, a minute lasts 61 seconds? If that sounds like something that might break some software, you'd be right! In this talk, we'll discuss the common ways that time is implemented in a number of libraries you probably depend on, how these representations can fall short of giving us a complete picture of what time it is, and what we can do about this state of affairs.
Chemistry 2015-02-15 07:47:00 +0000
John Feminella

* Discovery Projects: Strategies for Defining the Opportunity

At a certain point an idea can become so big that you need to invest in a small project to properly define the big one. The objective of a discovery project is to define the goals & requirements, then narrow the "cone of uncertainty" enough so that the development process can begin on the right foot.
Business 2015-02-14 21:25:51 +0000
Tom Martin

* Why Making a Programming Language is Awesome

Learn about the journey of creating Wake, a modern programming language
Hacks 2015-02-14 02:11:51 +0000
Michael R Fairhurst

* Sass: What It Is, How It's Used, and Why It's So Syntactically Awesome

This talk will start off with the basics of what Syntactically Awesome StyleSheets are, what features and functionality they have to offer, and why they're a great tool to have in your arsenal. We'll then delve into how to use Sass in developing your own sites and what tools you'll want to use alongside it, complete with a live demo and some in-production examples.
Cooking 2015-02-13 20:41:18 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Pelican: A Comparison of Static Site Generators

Want to make a static site or blog, but not sure where to start? Tired of using Wordpress and looking for something better? This talk will get into the nitty-gritty details of how Jekyll and Pelican -- two popular static site generators -- work, and explain how to choose which is best for your project. Using examples you can clone from github, we'll cover the pros and cons of both SSGs, discuss things that neither does well, and give you a better idea of how to get your site up and running (with an open source tool!).
Chemistry 2015-02-13 20:27:56 +0000
Lucy Wyman

* Crypto 101

Let's make cryptography less cryptic. This talk would give you a peek into the fun world of ciphers and encryption mechanisms with a basic understanding of the hard problems of mathematics behind the magic.
Chemistry 2015-02-13 16:50:26 +0000
Niharika Kohli

* Male/Female/Othered: Implementing Gender-Inclusiveness in User Data Collection

You want to gather information about your users that you can use to improve their experience and yours. They want their identities to be acknowledged and treated with respect. This talk is about meeting both needs: How to ask about gender in ways that welcome the diversity of reality while still being able to analyze the data you get back. We'll discuss the nature of that challenge, how some major websites address it, and example solutions for different scenarios.
Culture 2015-02-12 03:27:51 +0000
Finn Ellis, Jonathan Harker

* Removing Barriers: Ascend Project Post Mortem

Last year the Ascend Project was announced, then in the fall the first pilot took place in Portland. This year we'll report back on how it went, hear from participants, and break down what worked and what could be changed for future versions of this type of program. You'll definitely come away with some ideas for your next learning event, code school, or sponsored training.
Hacks 2015-02-12 00:52:50 +0000
Lukas Blakk, Kronda Adair

* Time for Change: How to approach an OS project switchover

So, who here has an open source project they maintain? Ok, of those people, who calls out or references. Who's had the other thing change in a certain way causing bugs and general headaches? It's a pretty common problem in open source, especially when you're dealing with API's and such. Eventually, services change, move, change, or even shut down completely. And it becomes a tricky decision on how to deal with this change, and how to switch over from an old service to the new. I'm going to talk about how you approach sun-setting interfacing with an old version of a service, and switching over to the new version, cleanly, with lots of spec coverage and testing. I'm not going to pretend that. We're not even fully finished with the switchover yet, and there's still plenty more to learn. But hopefully you won't make the same mistakes we did.
Cooking 2015-02-11 17:33:55 +0000
Peter Souter

* Project Fear

Project fear affects us all. Sometimes it’s rational fear tied to guaranteed failure. Other times it’s more irrational fear that a project will go off the rails due to unknowns missed in code architecture, scope/budget/timeline problems, or the team complexities of the project. This session tackles project fear by investigating its roots, its symptoms, and ultimately a number of successful coping mechanisms in order to help us all deliver more successful projects with healthier and happier teams.
Business 2015-02-10 18:32:41 +0000
Adam Edgerton

* What stuttering taught me about marketing - not your typical soft skills talk

Your weakness just might be your greatest strength.
Culture 2015-02-10 16:41:59 +0000
Sharon Steed

* Speaking for Non-Speakers

Many conference attendees come year after year without giving presentations. The sense that there's a high bar for perfection is pervasive, and people are afraid of being "wrong." Everyone has a story to tell about a problem they've solved or issues they've tackled. Learn how to share your experiences without fear, and join the speaker community!
Culture 2015-02-10 00:58:26 +0000
Kirsten Hunter

* Leveraging Docker to Enable Learning

When giving workshops or presenting online tutorials, it's frequently the case that the system setup can take longer than the actual learning exercises. Using Docker to provide a learning sandbox solves this problem while avoiding changing the learner's system in potentially destructive ways.
Cooking 2015-02-10 00:57:01 +0000
Kirsten Hunter

* How to Really Get Git

You already know how to use “git status”, “git push”, and “git add” for your personal projects. You know how to work on a team project with git version control. How do you achieve the next level of git mastery and fix mistakes? We’ll cover how to set up your git environment for a productive workflow, different ways to undo your mistakes in git, and finally, how to use the IPython notebook to automate an entire git workflow.
Hacks 2015-02-09 22:37:37 +0000
Susan Tan

* Build your own Ruby-powered Arcade Machine!

This session will cover the basics of game programming using Ruby, as well as the hardware you need in order to build and run your own Ruby-powered arcade machine.
Cooking 2015-02-09 22:09:49 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Better Project Planning Through User Story Mapping

Learn how to improve your agile development process through User Story Mapping, a technique that you can use to gather requirements easier, get everyone on the same page, and plan out what needs to be done while keeping the "big picture" in mind.
Business 2015-02-09 21:42:45 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Dipping Your Toe in the Ruby Water: Using Ruby with Non-Ruby Projects

This session will introduce you to the Ruby programming language by comparing it to PHP, and show some creative ways to start integrating Ruby with your non-Ruby projects.
Chemistry 2015-02-09 20:51:26 +0000
Andrew Havens

* Techniques and Tools for Literate DevOps

Lacking the Hermetic knowledge required to administrate servers, we take judicious notes and hyperlinks. Why not combine those written thoughts with the commands we enter to configure and tame our digital beasties? We have a tool for that.
Cooking 2015-02-07 04:41:11 +0000
Howard Abrams, Kasey Alusi

* Teaching Middle School to Program

This past year, I started an experiment and took a different approach to teaching middle school students how to program: Nothing. And you can do nothing too!
Culture 2015-02-07 04:24:27 +0000
Howard Abrams

* Bringing Open Source to the Federal Government

The story of how one federal agency decided to start living open source principles, built great tools, and attracted great developer talent.
Culture 2015-02-06 17:08:49 +0000
Bruce Arthur

* Open Source Tools of the Hardware Hacking Trade

Many embedded systems contain design flaws that could lead to exploitable vulnerabilities. In order to discover such flaws, hackers and engineers use a specific set of tools. In this session, Joe will discuss his favorite open source hardware hacking and reverse engineering tools, including those that monitor/decode digital communications, extract firmware, inject/spoof data, and identify/connect to debug interfaces.
Cooking 2015-02-03 05:57:44 +0000
Joe Grand

* 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started Programming

There's more to being a successful developer than simply being great at programming.
Culture 2015-02-03 05:55:25 +0000
Kerri Miller

* Becoming a Rocket Scientist With Open Source

The new space industry is expanding rapidly, with huge opportunities for open-source contributions. This talk focuses on the case study of Asterank, software that makes space data easier to access and explore. Its analysis and visualization tools have been used in government, private industry, and schools. The project has made public space data more open and usable for millions of people.
Hacks 2015-02-03 01:41:56 +0000
Ian Webster

* Continuous Delivery and Large Microservice Architectures: Reflections on Ioncannon

Continuous delivery of a monolith is easy, just automate, automate, automate! But what challenges will you run into applying the same ideas to 300 microservices? Come and find out!
Cooking 2015-02-02 21:50:29 +0000
Kevin Scaldeferri

* Put Up or Shut Up: An Open Letter to Companies Seeking Diverse Teams

People from marginalized communities struggle to break into tech, clawing our way through a racist, sexist, classist, ableist system only to be fired, quit or just suffer in misery. I’ll explore what it really takes to create a workplace that is truly welcoming of everyone.
Culture 2015-02-02 01:06:03 +0000
Kronda Adair

* JavaScript and Internet Controlled Hardware Prototyping

In this session we'll be exploring how to build rapid hardware prototypes using wifi and bluetooth low energy enabled Arduino boards, all controlled through JavaScript and API data, to allow for innovative, web enabled, software to hardware development techniques.
Hacks 2015-01-29 20:45:21 +0000
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Building a Mobile Location Aware System with Beacons

What if instead of a broad location, you could have pinpoint location awareness of someone in a physical space. How could this change everything about how we interact with the physical world? In this session we will be exploring Beacon technology, which enables this, the underlying Bluetooth Smart standard, and how we can use these systems to change everything from shopping, to accessibility for the disabled, all built on top of a mobile device.
Hacks 2015-01-29 20:43:23 +0000
Jonathan LeBlanc

* Hello, my name is __________.

Our personal identity is core to how we perceive ourselves and wish to be seen. All too often, however, applications, databases, and user interfaces are not designed to fully support the diversity of personal, social, cultural, and gender identities expressed throughout the world.
Cooking 2015-01-29 20:21:54 +0000
Nick Patch

* Dodge Disasters and March to Triumph as a Mentor

Good engineers write good code, but the best engineers raise the skills of their junior colleagues, too. If you're a senior Python engineer, you must learn to mentor new hires. Especially if you’re committed to diversity: mentorship is critical to the careers of women and minorities in tech. I have failed at mentoring, then succeeded. Learn from me and march to mentorship triumph.
Culture 2015-01-28 20:28:29 +0000
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

* Geeks and the News Cycle

Large news entities - like Gawker and Huffington Post - that cater to casual and regular consumers get some of their most popular news stories from places like Reddit, Twitter, and HackerNews. Their news stories are sourced by the user generated content of these sites - the commons if you will - they digest them, and then profit from the advertising income. This talk will look into how this consumer-newsgiant-consumer dynamic treats the communities that it benefits from, how the 'merit' of news stories' ranking on popularity competition sites like reddit relate to the meritocracy in tech, and how people react to suddenly being at the center of a media storm.
Culture 2015-01-28 04:20:33 +0000
Simon Vansintjan

* Performance Testing Crash Course

Take back an understanding of how to automate performance and load testing and evaluate the impact it has on performance and your business.
Cooking 2015-01-28 03:29:29 +0000
Dustin Whittle

* Sharing Economy: Setting the foundation of the future economy

Sharing Economy has the potential to move the world towards sustainability and circular design. But what if we get it wrong? What if we the people don't participate in setting and maintaining the foundation of this future economy?
Culture 2015-01-27 11:03:11 +0000
aleksandr tsukanov

* When Your Codebase Is Nearly Old Enough To Vote

What do you do when your project is so old that technology has changed around you? (Or, how do you future-proof a project that you've just started so that when it gets that old, you'll be ready?) Come hear a case study of Dreamwidth Studios, a fifteen-year-old web app with a codebase consisting of a quarter million lines of legacy Perl and a mission to modernize ... if it doesn't break everything.
Chemistry 2015-01-27 06:30:00 +0000
Denise Paolucci

* Open Source Hardware for Community Science

Closed-source scientific instrumentation doesn't work for community science. It's too expensive, too precise and delicate, and can't be repaired or rebuilt easily. Open-source hardware allows for a means of creating massive deployments of sensing systems, and pulling their data outputs together. This is the wave of the future.
Chemistry 2015-01-23 20:30:56 +0000
Pete Marchetto

* Bridging the Digital Divide with SMS Bots

We all know about Twitter and IRC bots, but with about 4/5 of people worldwide without smartphones SMS has the potential to reach those left behind the digital divide. We will discuss the various methods for developing an SMS bot, the legal and ethical implications of doing so, and we will build an SMS bot live.
Cooking 2015-01-23 19:15:56 +0000
Briar Schreiber

* Distribute all the things! - a primer for distributed systems in Go

In this talk I discuss how the features of the Go programming language make it quick and easy to build high-performance distributed systems. Go's specialized primitives, such as channels and goroutines, are instrumental in the language's ability to achieve concurrency. These primitives and common concurrency patterns are covered in this talk, along with a discussion on the challenges of building distributed systems.
Cooking 2015-01-23 17:09:46 +0000
Georgi Knox

* Roll Your Own Platform as a Service with Docker

What Are a Platform’s Components? * Builders/Packagers that create a deployable artifact * Artifact repositories to hold the deployable artifact * Provisioners that spin-up new services * Hosts that run a deployable artifact * Routers/Load balancers to * Direct traffic from the public to their nearest/most available application servers * Load-balancers/reverse-proxies/service discovery to * Route traffic from an application server to composing services * Slowly ramp-up load as a new version of a service is deployed
Hacks 2015-01-22 19:12:45 +0000
Zee Spencer

* A Crash Course In Reactive Programming with Play Framework

Let's build a sample application using reactive programming principles and the Play Framework along with AngularJS.
Chemistry 2015-01-22 15:52:48 +0000
Michael Pigg

* Using Asterisk to Stop Robocallers

Robocallers are very annoying. Even when the Do Not Call list works, it doesn't cover all robo callers. This talk is about combining Asterisk (an open source PBX) running on a BeagleBone and some inexpensive hardware to really stop these annoying callers.
Cooking 2015-01-22 15:41:21 +0000
Michael Pigg

* Growing up; what’s a techie to do in their mid 30s to keep their career moving

In this session, I’ll share my journey from developer to evangelist to business development. You’ll learn how I got there, what I learned along the way, and what you should look for in order to determine when it makes sense to do a career transition.
Culture 2015-01-21 22:55:37 +0000
John Mertic

* Thinking big picture; the vernacular for today’s buyer

In Thinking Big Picture, I’ll describe how to better engage your prospects, tell your story, and leave buyers with confidence in your ability to deliver. You’ll walk away with strategies for better positioning your product and executing on key big picture strategies -- without a huge pre-sales team.
Business 2015-01-21 22:54:48 +0000
John Mertic

* A hitchhikers guide to the cloud, or anywhere else your customer might want your app

In this talk, I’ll explore how a customer experiences the go live process, and how you as a vendor need to rethink the definition of a successful deployment in today’s complex deployment world.
Business 2015-01-21 22:53:55 +0000
John Mertic

* Test-Builder and beyond

Test-Builder, the foundation upon which Test-More, Test-Simple, and just about any other Test-Package are built, is getting new internals. Test-Builder and its internals are nearly 10 years old, and they are showing their age. It has been known for some time that things would have to change eventually. A few years back Schwern launched the Test-Builder 2 project. This effort ultimately failed to reach adoption. However a recent change, which simply modified a comment, managed to break Moose and other related packages, we simply can't sit around and let such things continue to happen.
Chemistry 2015-01-21 22:52:18 +0000
Chad Granum

* The End of JS Frameworks: ES6 and Web Components

JavaScript has a long history of being difficult to structure and maintain. To deal with this complexity a swath of frameworks have emerged over the years. At a glacial pace we have seen the web improve and those changes are ubiquitous now. ES6 and web components are happening! Come to this talk to learn how to get started with vanilla web platform code.
Hacks 2015-01-21 19:16:48 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* Create your Making Money Machine

No, it's not a BitCoin mining machine. See what kind of vending machine you can create using open hardware and FOSS
Hacks 2015-01-20 17:29:20 +0000
Jeff Prestes

* Open Power: Electoral Reform and Public Empowerment

“When we relate and share knowledge authentically, this places us in a state of grace, a state of 'win-win' harmony with all others, and establishes trust among all.” “The bottom line is that our government is not intelligent about how it pursues the public interest, because its decisions are not informed decisions (and its interest is generally not the public's).” “I realized in 1988 that my life as a spy specializing in secrets was not only unproductive, it was in sharp opposition to what we actually need: full access to true information, and consequently, the ability to create Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT).”
Culture 2015-01-20 14:59:38 +0000
Robert David Steele

* Cassandra at the Keyboard: Whistleblowing at all scales

What do you do if you see something that needs change in your organization. How do you "say something" for your "see something"? What are the benefits and drawbacks of even minor whistleblowing?
Culture 2015-01-20 03:37:15 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* 90 writing tips in 45 minutes

Almost every job involves a little writing, even if it's code comments or repair notes on a car. But what if you don't feel confident with writing? I have a rapid-fire presentation of writing tips and tricks that can help get you started, keep you going, and make your work better, even if you don't think you're a writer, I bet it will help!
Hacks 2015-01-20 02:50:35 +0000
Heidi Waterhouse

* Numfar, do the dance of compatibility: moving languages forward without leaving users behind

Moving a language forward in backward incompatible ways is often necessary, but can be hard on users. In this talk, I'll compare and contrast approaches used to support older code bases in different languages, and look at what works and what doesn't.
Cooking 2015-01-20 00:53:35 +0000
Adam Harvey

* Welcome to the (home office) jungle

Working remotely can be great. It can also be terrible. All that freedom! All that flexibility! None of that pesky human contact! Of course, it's not all sunshine and roses (particularly that last one), and I'll be talking about how to balance remote work to get the most out of it.
Business 2015-01-20 00:50:16 +0000
Adam Harvey

* Get Your Shoes (Back) On!

Years ago the enigmatic Rubyist _why created Shoes, a tiny GUI toolkit for writing fun, simple applications in Ruby. Shoes served as the foundation for Hackety Hack, a programming environment specially designed to be accessible to kids.
Chemistry 2015-01-17 00:40:15 +0000
Jason Clark

* Homebrewing, Simple as Ruby

With a peculiar vocabulary, strict traditions, and heaps of arcane lore, brewing beer yourself can be overwhelming to the uninitiated… not unlike learning programming.
Hacks 2015-01-17 00:38:40 +0000
Jason Clark

* Patches: Stories of Open Source

Open source software is awesome. It provides the tools for our jobs, our hobbies, and our dreams. And anyone can contribute! Despite that openness, though, I hesitated for years before getting involved.
Culture 2015-01-17 00:36:36 +0000
Jason Clark

* Testing the Multiverse

It’s a basic principle of testing that minimizing dependencies will make you happier, faster, and more productive. But what happens when you can’t?
Cooking 2015-01-17 00:34:32 +0000
Jason Clark

* The Public Library As An (Almost) Open Source Institution

Your public library can be one of your best allies for creating, distributing, and promoting Open Source ideas and projects. They want to help - they just need to know how.
Culture 2015-01-16 21:06:56 +0000
Alex Byrne

* Running Open Source Java Platforms in the Public Cloud

Running a single instance of anything is easy - but how do you configure platforms for clustered environment in the cloud? Learn how to effectively launch a fleet of clustered Java-based platforms in the cloud, with or without containers, and carry that knowledge to run many others (WildFly, Spring Boot, Infinispan, and more).
Cooking 2015-01-16 18:25:50 +0000
Ray Tsang

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Business 2015-01-16 14:56:06 +0000
Ed Finkler

* An Introduction to Slim for PHP

Why is Slim cool? Because it gives you what you need to start an HTTP application, and then gets out of the way. It lets me use the components I want to use. It doesn't require any external dependencies. And it doesn't make me learn a whole bunch of framework-specific stuff that will be useless everywhere else. I like that. And I think you will too. This session will cover why you'd choose Slim, building a "hello world" app with just a few lines of code, how to integrate your favorite components, and scaling Slim up to the needs of larger apps.
Cooking 2015-01-16 14:52:46 +0000
Ed Finkler

* Stronger Than Fear: Mental Health in the Developer Community

Mental disorders are the largest contributor to disease burden in North America, but the developer community and those who employ us are afraid to face the problem head-on. In this talk, we'll examine the state of mental health awareness in the developer workplace, why most developers feel it isn't safe to talk about mental health, and what we can do to change the culture and save lives.
Culture 2015-01-16 14:48:40 +0000
Ed Finkler

* SlamData: SQL Isn't Just for RDBMS Anymore

NoSQL: the technology that everyone loves to hate on. Yet despite shaky formal foundations and horror stories of career-ending proportions, there's one thing I'm pretty sure of: NoSQL is here to stay. MongoDB is now the 4th most popular database of the world, and the company commercializing the open source database is valued at more than $1.6 billion dollars. For the longest time, the only way of accessing data in these NoSQL databases has been writing code: every database has its own API which lets you do various random things in sometimes very strange ways. That works for building applications, but it doesn't work for tooling, most specifically, for analytics and reporting. If you've ever tried to building a data processing workflow or some reporting machinery on top a NoSQL database, you know exactly what I'm talking about: it's painful, write-once, often buggy code you'll end up throwing away some day. What if there were another way? What if you could query databases like MongoDB as easily as MySQL? What if you could hook up standard open source database tools to MongoDB like Squirrel, and have things just work? Thanks to an open source project I've been working on for the past year and a half, I'm happy to say all these things are possible. ...
Chemistry 2015-01-15 14:26:59 +0000
John A. De Goe

* Building and maintaining a healthy community

Open Source organizations and projects are driven by the strength of its community. We have often seen but how big communities fall because of wrong ways of handling it or mismanagements. My talk will be around the lines of how a community leader or manager can take a few extra responsibilities to keep a community healthy.
Culture 2015-01-13 08:38:35 +0000
Priyanka Nag

* Mastering Bootstrap: how to get the most out of Bootstrap by writing modular CSS themes

Take Bootstrap to the next level by learning how to setup a development environment with harp.js, setup a Less variable and mixin library, make your theme modular, and deploy your theme for use on your projects or for sale on a marketplace.
Cooking 2015-01-11 08:36:42 +0000
Matt Lambert

* HTTP Can Do That?

I have explored weird corners of HTTP -- malformed requests that try to trick a site admin into clicking spam links in 404 logs, an API that responds to POST but not GET, and more. In this talk I'll walk you through those (using Python, netcat, and other tools you might have lying around the house).
Hacks 2015-01-10 00:57:34 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara