Culture track

Give us your people recipes! What makes open technology and culture communities effective? Demonstrate how you motivate people to work together well.
Give us your people recipes! What makes open technology and culture communities effective? Demonstrate how you motivate people to work together well. Example topics from the past include “’Why did you do that?’ You’re more automated than you think.” and “Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls.”

Sessions for this track

* Badging and Beyond: Rubrics and Building a Culture of Recognition as Community Building Strategies

What are the qualities you need more of in your open source community?
Culture
Larissa Shapiro

* "Why are these people following me?": Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished

So you've had an idea, or noticed a gap that needs filling, or wondered why no one's talking about an issue you care about. Like the motivated and competent person you are, you start working, or writing, or talking. People start noticing you, listening to you, even asking for your opinion about their own projects--and one day, you realize they're treating you just like you treat your own role models. You find this unsettling. Surely motivation and competence aren't that special, you think. You, a leader? Can't be. And if you actually are a leader, what do you do now?
Culture
Frances Hocutt

* Airplanes : Sailboats :: Mobile : Desktop

What if the way that airplanes were designed and how it improved sailing had some deep lessons around the future of user experience? Sailboats improved significantly after the discovery of flight, and mobile design is improving a great deal of user experience as well. How can we think about applying these lessons? What's still missing?
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Civilizing IRC and forums: moderation strategies for mutual respect

As a project's public IRC channel or forum grows, it's hard to keep it friendly. People get frustrated with each other, people have "different" senses of humor, disagreements escalate...oh goodness, it can be a mess. This isn't great for retaining community members or welcoming new ones. I'll share my strategies for dealing with problems, learned at the scale of hundreds of forum threads, tens of thousands of forum visitors, and dozens of IRC chatters every day.
Culture
Britta Gustafson

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling

* Deconstructing Open Source Contributions

Everyone wants to make contributing to open source projects more accessible and fun. But how do we do that? One way is to analyze past contributions to identify potential obstacles and opportunities for intervention and support. This workshop will use our own experiences as contributors to explore how the process works, using a simple but effective reflective activity.
Culture
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Distributed Agile Development or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Remoties

This is the story of how the mobile web engineering team at the Wikimedia Foundation became an extremely high-functioning and successful agile team: by embracing - rather than shying away from - a distributed model. This talk will explore the agile team's journey and how we cope with the inherent tension of remoteness and the agile principle, 'The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation'.
Culture
Arthur Richards

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey

* Feminist Point of View: Lessons From Running the Geek Feminism Wiki

The Geek Feminism wiki is one of the central resources for feminist activism in geek communities ranging from open source software to science fiction fandom. Learn how the GF wiki started, how it's run, and what we've learned about doing activism the wiki way.
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Forking Pop Culture and Remixing Code: Where Open Movements Intersect

Creative open culture communities operate in many of the same ways as open source communities and share many of the same principles. How are fan writers like open source contributors? What can hackers learn from remixers (and vice versa)? And what happens when creative communities start building open source projects to support their own work?
Culture
Nancy McLaughlin

* From navel gazing to ass kicking: Building leadership in the journalism code community

Amidst all the hand wringing surrounding the "future of journalism," developers, designers, and data geeks working in newsrooms are building projects and tools that engage readers and ripple across the web. We'll discuss ways this community welcomes, supports, and promotes new members and leaders.
Culture
Erika Owens

* From the Bottom Up: Building Community-Owned and -Operated Mesh Networks

This panel highlights the work of a few folks representing part of a broad, international movement consisting of network engineers, community change makers, researchers, architects, and thinkers who are building decentralized and autonomous communications infrastructure. We know that the Internet is deeply broken, and we are rebuilding, from the inside out. We mitigate the ills of interception and interference on the net by facilitating networks that are owned, operated, and governed by the people that use them.
Culture
Jenny Ryan, Mitar Milutinovic, Marc Juul, Russell Senior

* Geek Choir

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Generational Relay: Passing the Open Source Torch

People leave Open Source projects, and that's ok. Failing to plan for it isn't. How one community is recovering from the loss of its first generation and preparing for the rise of its third.
Culture
Eric Steele

* Get more contributors! Lessons from the Drupal Ladder.

A small contributor pool is a recipe for burnout and can harm or hold back your project. Learn how offering a structured approach for step-by-step skill-building can combat imposter syndrome and build community, thereby increasing the number and diversity of your project's contributors.
Culture
Rhys Fureigh

* Hacking In-Group Bias for Fun and Profit

Our lives and social interactions are governed by sociology and psychology. As geeks, we strive to understand how the technology around us works, and we strive to find ways to make it better. Society is basically one big, complex piece of technology, and, like all technology, it is hackable. This talk will explain how you can do that.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* Hold on to Your Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* It's Dangerous to Go Alone: Battling the Invisible Monsters in Tech

It can be hard to focus on your love of coding when you are regularly battling invisible issues like insecurity, anxiety, and lack of confidence. This talk will identify invisible issues programmers struggle with, talk about their impact, discuss personal experiences dealing with them, and share some tools useful in fighting back.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Keeping your culture afloat through a tidal wave of interest ~~\o/~~

During the height of interest to the project, there were often several new people arriving in the channel per day. That may not sound like a lot, but everyone had questions and would be interested in different things; it could take a twenty minute conversation or so with someone who knew a lot about the project in order to properly greet, inform, and orient new people. The founders didn't have a few spare hours around the clock to personally devote to making sure that each new arrival was welcomed, felt welcomed, had their questions answered, and had their willingness to contribute channeled into something which needed the help and suited their skills. There was a lot about this that we could have automated or dumped into a higher-latency format like email. The first time someone proposed automating the welcoming dance it was like they'd slapped me in the face. The personal touch bit was crucial, and automating it would have struck all the wrong notes. The project was supposed to be for people, by people, and showing that we're human and we're committed to keeping it small and personal was crucial to keeping the culture intact.
Culture
Azure Lunatic, Kat Toomajian

* Learning Open Source as a course in Africa University

PHP, MySql, PhoneGap, PrestaShop, Magento, Wordpress, Drupal.
Culture
Olainiyan Adewale

* Mushroom Data Demystified

Mushroom Observer is a tool for logging and mapping fungus sightings. Beginners and professionals collaborate to produce a comprehensive data set, which has contributed to the burgeoning science of mycology. While this talk focuses on Mushroom Observer, it will be an overview of usefulness of open source amateur contributions to scientific research.
Culture
Lauren Hudgins

* Open Source is Not Enough: The Importance of Algorithm Transparency

Opaque algorithms increasingly control our access to information, on the web and beyond. Why is that a problem, and what can we do about it?
Culture
Rachel Shadoan

* Open Sourcing Mental Illness: Ending The Stigma

An open, honest discussion of mental illness from the perspective of a web developer. We can learn to survive, cope, and thrive.
Culture
Ed Finkler

* Rocket Science On Github

Git isn't just for code. What about CAD files? Experimental test data? How do you manage a multidisciplinary project with git? Last year Portland State Aerospace Society, a relatively large open source rocketry project, moved all their work onto github. I'll share my experience with the switch from a few self hosted git repos to a full fledged github presence. What worked, what hasn't, github's features for non coders, and a little on the future of open science.
Culture
Nathan Bergey

* Scottish Folk Dance: If you can follow code, you can dance!

Can you follow and write code? Do you participate in the ebb and flow of open source communities? Does pivoting those skills into a social form of exercise appeal to you? If so, then Scottish folk dancing might be for you!
Culture
Darrick Wong

* Slytherin 101: How To Win Friends and Influence People

Do you wish that you were better at getting people to do what you need them to do? Do you keep getting put in charge of things and then get stuck wondering how the heck you're supposed to get things done? Do you keep getting into conflicts with other people because of stuff you've said, and you aren't entirely sure why? Fortunately, Slytherin House has you covered. Come to this talk and learn the basics of how to hack human relationships, using the tools of cunning and ambition to achieve inter-House harmony. As long as you promise not to use these techniques to support the next Dark Lord, of course.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Speaker Support of Awesomeness: How I went from stage fright to stage presence and want to help others do the same.

Once upon a time, I was terrified of public speaking. I went from having stage fright to being a stage presence who speaks at conferences. I run a support group for old and new speakers called the "Tech Conf Speaker Support of Awesomeness." I want to talk about what we do, why we do it, and how well it's worked out so far. This talk is about speaking for the first time, improving your talks, and how conference organizers and attendees can help too.
Culture
Julie Pagano

* Supporting communities with Gittip

There are lots of people doing good work in the world, and while there seems to be a myriad of ways to provide financial "donations", few of them provide a way to do so in a sustainable manner. We're going to look at Gittip, a freedom loving platform to provide a sustainable, predictable income to those making the world a better place.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Surviving Support: 10 Tips for Saving Your Users and Yourself

When I open sourced my plugin to the WordPress community, user support was one of the last things on my mind - I was more excited to have written awesome code and a helpful site extension. Shortly thereafter though, customer support was the only thing I had time for. When your user base ranges in skill level from experienced developer to your grandmother, well… you've gotta be prepared for just about anything. This session will highlight the challenges and benefits of stellar support and offer a few tricks to make the process as painless as possible for both your user and yourself.
Culture
Julie Cameron

* The Case for Junior Developers

Are you passionate about building tech, but think there is no place in your organization for junior developers? Come explore the true costs and benefits of hiring junior developers and see how you can improve your company while helping juniors become the best developers they can be.
Culture
Shawna Scott

* The joy of volunteering with open technology and culture

Volunteering is a fun way to explore your interests and passions. In this talk, I will detail my experiences in volunteering with open projects like Wikipedia and Mozilla. I will also talk about fun ways to introduce newbies into volunteering based on my experience with conducting outreach sessions for open projects.
Culture
Netha Hussain

* The Keys to Working Remotely

When I tell people I work from home, they tend to assume I spend the day playing with my dog outside. It's beyond comprehension to most that I actually spend as much time working as they do, sometimes more. I hope to enlighten those close-minded people about the possibilities working from home offers and how to do it well. Session slides: http://www.carsonshold.com/talks/keys-to-working-remotely/
Culture
Carson Shold

* The Promise of Collaborative Magic

Open source thrives on the idea of people helping one another in reaching their project's goals. But is it working the way that it's supposed to be? This session hopes to discuss the importance of constructive collaboration in our communities, how we encourage them, and what we can do if they're not working out the way they're supposed to.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Towards more diversity-friendly social networks

How can we make social networks more "diversity-friendly"? It starts with an anti-oppression attitude, embedded in the community guidelines and norms; and includes the right tools, technologies, and policies. This session will look at what does and doesn't work in a variety of online environments, and will include an annotated collection of resources on the wiki.
Culture
Jon Pincus, Deborah Pierce

* Trust, Community, and Automatic Updates

WordPress shipped in October what is perhaps its most polarizing feature ever — automatic updates in the background of self-hosted web software, on by default and no easy way to turn it off. In most open source communities, this would be cause for open revolt. Learn how through trust, communication, and a steadfast commitment to its philosophies, the WordPress core team convinced a skeptical community to go along, even if it meant users giving up some control.
Culture
Andrew Nacin

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante

* When Many Eyes Fail You: Tales from Security Standards and Open Source

It's often said that "given many eyes, all bugs are shallow" and open source proponents love to list this as a reason that open source is more secure than its closed-source relatives. While that makes a nice sound bite, the reality of security with many eyeballs doesn't fit so nicely into a tweet. This talk will explore some of the things that surprised me in going from academic security research to industry security research in open source and open standards.
Culture
Terri Oda

* Working Effectively with People in Government on Open Source Projects

Ever thought about ways to use your open source skills to improve your city? In this session we'll talk about successful models for working with people in government, from pitching your project, communicating effectively, finding experts, tracking down data, to launching in the community.
Culture
Jason Denizac

* Write an Excellent Programming Blog

As a member of the open source community, do you contribute only code, or also words? Writing about programming benefits yourself and others. This talk outlines solid article structures, suggests topics to write about, explains how blogging about programming is special, and inspires you to write articles of enduring value.
Culture
A. Jesse Jiryu Davis

Proposals for this track

* Accessibility Evangelism for the Non-Specialist

So, you probably know why accessibility is important already (and if you don't we can talk about that a little too!). Maybe your blind friend uses your app, or you're super passionate about W3C standards. But you're having a hard time getting that idea across to the other people working on your project. How do you motivate people to work on accessibility, and change the perception that it's hard and obscure? This talk will draw from the toolboxes of accessibility evangelists and community managers. We'll discuss a range of strategies to help contributors understand the value of accessibility, and help you incentivize contributions in this area.
Culture 2014-04-11 03:04:28 +0000
Katherine Mancuso

* Anonymous Social Networks - Why we need them

There is a new type of social media causing quite a disruption in the industry. It is a social media where people create posts anonymously
Culture 2014-03-26 23:14:07 +0000
A.J. Weinzettel

* Apprenticeships: I implore you!

Talk Outline: My background pre-programming Attending gSchool (6 month Ruby on Rails program), hired as an apprentice Why we need apprenticeships What senior developers and teams get out of apprenticeships What you can do / My suggestions for working with apprentices
Culture 2014-03-12 20:14:09 +0000
Jennifer Eliuk

* Balancing Corporate Need and Community Good: Thoughts from the Xen Project

When you have a project with strong corporate interest, how do you safeguard the Open Source community life and values? How do you keep Open Source from being simply another corporate development methodology when it is, in fact, the key to geek empowerment?
Culture 2014-03-17 15:01:51 +0000
Russell Pavlicek

* Beyond Feature Requests: what do users really want?

Moving from pie-in-the-sky feature requests to an actionable set of staged designs buildable on a non-profit's budget. We sat down with power users of our tools to figure out what the actual use cases for the map data they generated were and how our software could be re-designed around it. I'll discuss the design research, moderated discussions, and data narrative creation with our user community to imagine version 2.0 of our application Mapknitter.
Culture 2014-04-11 23:08:08 +0000
mathew lippincott

* Blueflood: A case study in open-sourcing a large piece of infrastructure software

The hardest nut to crack in most open sources projects is usually not technical. Figuring out the right ingredients to a successful community is often the difference between successful and less-successful open source projects.
Culture 2014-03-24 14:41:16 +0000
Gary Dusbabek

* Breeding Hackers the hard way

There is no easy path into knowledge, but a "bait" can lead one individual into taking the hard path.
Culture 2014-04-11 22:06:39 +0000
Rodrigo Chiossi

* Can Open Access to video tutorials make educators work harder?

Experiment with open access to video tutorials as key learning platforms where students learn, contribute and educators use the teaching time in a more effective manner.
Culture 2014-04-03 03:43:06 +0000
Subhashish Panigrahi

* Clueless to Collaborator on a Github Open Source Project

Even if you have development chops, learning git and open source culture can be confusing and intimidating. Or maybe you're an experienced open-sourcer looking to gain insight as to how to get more people involved. Either way, come hear the tale of a knowledgeable fool's journey to becoming a collaborator on Ractive.js.
Culture 2014-04-05 06:27:50 +0000
Marty Nelson

* Effective Projects with Family and Friends

Always wanted to work on an open source project with family or close friends? We’ll talk through the joys and challenges, how to turn the latter into the former and create an effective working relationship.
Culture 2014-04-02 02:56:39 +0000
Catriona Buhayar, Bill Madill

* Employment gap?take a open source sabbatical!

Employment gap?time to get creative with open source contributions
Culture 2014-04-09 20:48:19 +0000
neetu jain

* Free Software Foundation: Volunteer Empire

People are often surprised to find out that the Free Software Foundation only has around 10 employees. Our outreach and activities would not be possible without the thousands of volunteers who make our work possible. Managing the multitude of individual volunteers and volunteer projects has its own difficulties, but also incredible rewards. Tailoring structure, communication, and instructional materials for each type of volunteer and project is key for keeping a well run volunteer empire. We will explore this tailoring through the lens of some of the largest and smallest volunteer projects that the Free Software Foundation facilitates.
Culture 2014-04-04 18:34:56 +0000
Donald Robertson

* From Knowing to Understanding: Creating Learning Materials for the Real World

Open Source has changed: From its origins as a craft for the dedicated few it has now been adopted by the masses. Now it is our turn to change: Leave your developer goggles behind and learn how to bring your craft to the people.
Culture 2014-04-05 02:15:42 +0000
Morten Rand-Hendriksen

* From the Inside Out: How Self-Talk Affects Your Community

Identifying and discouraging negative self-talk is a simple thing, but it can have a huge impact on your community in a positive way. It increases self-confidence, improves morale, and generally results in happier, more productive community participants. This, in turn, will make you happy.
Culture 2014-04-04 16:50:29 +0000
Kat Toomajian

* Growing an Organic Cyber Security Community

One thing that's worked really well for us is that, rather than lecturing at the students, the two faculty act more like any other member of the team. We work through problems together, and we encourage anyone and everyone to suggest solutions. To show how this works, I'll step through a couple of online security challenges with the audience as the team. To keep it accessible to even the beginners, the challenges will be taken from an entry-level exercise like "Bandit" from Over The Wire. http://www.overthewire.org/wargames/
Culture 2014-04-11 18:32:58 +0000
Charles Wright

* Herculean Labors for Mortals: Lessons in making daunting tasks manageable

Lessons learned from messy migrations and unruly upgrades. Sometimes we inherit (or create!) big messes, and have to untangle them before we can make more progress. I'll talk about some past and current projects that seemed like they might require Xena: Warrior Project Manager, and techniques that allowed me and my team to succeed (or at least live to fight another day), focusing on what can be generalized to many circumstances and projects.
Culture 2014-04-02 15:19:14 +0000
Juliana Perry

* Herding 1000 Cats^H^H^H^HDevelopers: What Openstack has done to scale contributions horizontally

Since its small beginnings in 2010 at the Austin design summit, Openstack's developer base has grown tremendously and is now more than 1000 strong. A variety of tools have been put in place to accommodate this growth including design summits, code review, continuous integration on steroids, and more.
Culture 2014-04-04 22:50:36 +0000
Clark Boylan

* How Not to Be Lonely: An Extrovert's Guide to Working Alone

I have two batteries (you may have more). My work battery governs my ability to be productive. My life battery governs my
 ability to be happy. Learning to care for my batteries was the most critical aspect of my success with remote work.
Culture 2014-04-07 15:21:44 +0000
Jeremy Flores

* How to be a functional programmer without being a jerk about it

It's OK to admit it: All your friends are coming in to work in the morning talking about that wicked sweet algorithm they wrote in like 3 lines of OCaml, and you're a little jealous. You went and downloaded haskell and started playing around and then: "OH GOD HOW DO I WRITE A LOOP WAIT WHY?". Come learn the principles of functional you can apply in any language without the condescension.
Culture 2014-04-11 13:09:12 +0000
Nathan Dotz

* How To Be A Great Developer

Being a great developer is much more than technical know-how. Empathy, communication, and reason are at least as important, but are undervalued in our industry. We'll examine the impact these skills can have and how to apply them to our work.
Culture 2014-04-11 20:18:02 +0000
Edward Finkler

* Improving a community website - lessons from renovating ovirt.org

Community websites are the main gateway for potential users and contributors to learn about any open source project. Are they always clearly presenting the project, its goals and status and ways to efficiently communicate with its members? In this talk, I will share our experience and recommendations from renovating the website for oVirt.
Culture 2014-03-17 13:28:16 +0000
Alissa Bonas

* Join a HOT Activation: How to Respond to a Disaster with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team as a Digital Volunteer

Join a HOT Activation: Digital Volunteering for Disaster Response
Culture 2014-04-02 11:51:33 +0000
Kate Chapman

* KIWI KIWI! The obscene diversity of everyday life in the open source work world.

Working in open source constantly forces us to interact with extreme technical diversity and complex inter-dependencies. How do we cope, how do we maintain a sense of wonder, and what are the social consequences?
Culture 2014-04-12 01:58:46 +0000
Donald Delmar Davis

* Learn by Making: How We Construct Our Knowledge and Skills

We learn by making things, sharing them, discussing them, and reflecting on them. Let's talk about the intersection of making and education, including constructionism, sharing what you make online, and more.
Culture 2014-03-06 00:25:24 +0000
Josh Bancroft

* Lessons Learned From The Apache Way

The Apache Way is common phrase for the small, but important, list of basic community and development tenets that ensure FOSS project success.
Culture 2014-04-04 17:34:01 +0000
Jim Jagielski

* Meat Culture

Meatspace Chat is an open-source public chatroom with a simple premise: Every message you send includes a 2-second animated gif taken by your webcam. No accounts, no usernames, no permanent database. In this talk we’ll look at the community, projects, and cultural norms that have grown around the chat, and what happens when you chat with strangers face-to-face.
Culture 2014-04-04 18:21:37 +0000
Caleb Troughton

* Programming in the Small - Teaching my 5 Year Old Ruby

My children are growing up in an age of devices, phones and tablets, that hide so much of the underlying machine. Come with me on my journey to teach my daughter how computers really work, using Ruby and a love for drawing and games as our guides.
Culture 2014-04-02 23:05:10 +0000
Jason Clark

* Programming Motherfucker or how I rediscovered my hacker spirit

Programming should be fun so I want to share my story of how I made it fin for me again.
Culture 2014-03-30 22:42:33 +0000
Ole Michaelis

* Proposal: "I come from a Land Down Under. No, the other one. Or: Why New Zealand is a fantastic place for open sourcers"

This session is a presentation on some of the wide array of cool open source, open data, & open science things happening in New Zealand and will include discussion of functional political activism in a small parliamentary democracy, The Hobbit, mandatory minimum four-week PTO requirements, unarmed cops, no TSA, and lots of pictures of spectaculars vistas, beaches, recreational opportunities, and the basics of expatriation.
Culture 2014-04-04 02:35:38 +0000
Daniel Spector

* Rebirth via Open Source

How open source is helping to restore one coder's life balance
Culture 2014-04-05 04:52:54 +0000
James Carrasquer

* Scaling Open Source Outreach

In 2013, we ran a dozen open source outreach events at college campuses and reached hundreds of students, but for every event we ran there were more invitations we didn't have the resources to accept. In 2014, we're focused on scaling our workshops that so that community organizers everywhere can use our materials and welcome more people into open source. In this talk, we'll discuss what works and what doesn't when it comes to scaling community outreach.
Culture 2014-04-04 19:39:12 +0000
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

* Slower is Better

One of the most common reasons a team ultimately decides to develop software behind closed doors, rather than using an open-source model, is because they believe working in the open will slow them down. And, frankly, they're right. It really does slow you down. But that is perhaps the best thing that could happen to your project.
Culture 2014-04-12 04:29:14 +0000
Kurt Griffiths

* Stewardship of Open Source Microprojects

System administrators and devops engineers today are writing, sharing, and contributing back to more code than ever before. This has given rise to a new class of Open Source project: the open source microproject.
Culture 2014-04-04 05:31:31 +0000
William Van Hevelingen, Spencer Krum

* Teaching Open Source Development in the College Classroom

Having attended the Open Source Bridge the last few years and contributed to open source myself, it is clear that there is a disconnect between open source development and the academic Computer Science world. Students are often intimidated by open source projects because they are run so differently and require a different set of skills than academic projects. This Fall, I will be teaching a course on Open Source development at Pacific University. I want to lay out for you the activities, topics, and projects that I plan on covering to see if these mesh with your experience as open source developers.
Culture 2014-03-21 23:19:26 +0000
Chadd Williams

* The Coder as Artist: Painting with Pixels and Numbers

Popular culture would have us believe that programming and art are polar opposites. In reality, code is just another medium with which we are creating art every day. Learn how embracing code as our art and artists as our community will help us create a more beautiful and accessible world.
Culture 2014-04-05 05:06:15 +0000
Shawna Scott

* Three is a magic number

Many aspects of Open Source can be confusing... In this session, Jim will bring simplicity to numerous aspects of FOSS.
Culture 2014-04-04 17:37:58 +0000
Jim Jagielski

* Three Pair Programming Games

Pair programming is a great technique for learning and collaborating, but it can be a challenge if you're not used to it. In this hands-on workshop, I'll use short, structured exercises to give you a taste of what great pairing can be like.
Culture 2014-04-05 03:42:06 +0000
Moss Collum

* What's preventing your organization from using Free/Open Source Software today?

It's 2014, and even your parents have heard the terms "open source" and "linux". Your project dutifully releases source code and contributes to the community, but you're still dependent upon proprietary software, even when perfectly good FOSS alternatives exist. If there's an open alternative, why aren't you using it? As a project, what specific actions can you take to help other FOSS projects escape proprietary software and use your software instead?
Culture 2014-04-05 05:55:38 +0000
Robinson Tryon

* Why You Should Be An Open Source Project

You are a collection of code. You’ve got an initial commit from your parents, pull requests of childhood influences, and now you, a grown up project. How do you continue to “develop” as a human? You expose your internals and merge pull requests. IRL, that means sharing your self genuinely and integrating lessons from others. The same things that make a good open source project make a happy person.
Culture 2014-04-11 19:08:20 +0000
Carol Huang

* Working for a Free/Libre/Open World: Snowdrift.coop as a model of community patronage and participation in software and beyond

In designing Snowdrift.coop, we have done our due diligence. For example, we actually reviewed over 700 crowdfunding and related platforms. We've read dozens of Codes of Conduct. This is the Open Source ideal: making the most of past resources and ideas. I can tell you about such things as the struggles with the idea of bounty fundraising (where you offer to pay if someone makes a certain feature or fixes a certain bug in a program). It's been a popular idea but has some fatal flaws. There have been dozens of failed bounty-style funding systems, but a few have somewhat succeeded (and I can tell you which of those are the most ethical and Open Source). People who have not researched the history keep proposing this same flawed idea over and over. In this talk, I'll share with you the challenges and insights in building a new platform dedicated to Free/Libre/Open ideals and how we have made tough choices about when to avoid wheel-reinventing and when to break with the past and push for new ideals.
Culture 2014-04-01 19:58:09 +0000
Aaron Wolf

* Writing debuggable code

You made a thing, and other people are actually using it! And finding bugs! And reporting them! Now what do you do??? You write tests.
Culture 2014-04-05 22:51:31 +0000
Jonathan Harker