B304

Sessions for this room

Tuesday, June 24 - 10:00 AM

* UX Design in Action: Redesigning the Mailman UI

One of the upcoming features in the Mailman 3 project is a front-end redesign of the mail archiver web interface. Learn more about the new interface, its progress so far, and the designing challenges of building a mobile-first responsive web site. The talk will also illustrate our design process and provide you with design methods and evaluation techniques that you can take back to your own project.
Chemistry
Karen Tang
Tuesday, June 24 - 11:00 AM

* Power Tuning Linux: A Case Study

In this talk we will do a reality-check in terms of the power consumption on off-the-shelve systems running “out of the box” Linux distributions.
Chemistry
Alexandra Yates
Tuesday, June 24 - 01:30 PM

* NerdCred++; How to Customize your Bash Prompt

The terminal is a powerful tool on any developer’s belt. The command line interface provides extensive functionality via simple entry of commands. In this workshop we will customize the development experience by adding personal ⭐︎flair⭐︎ and making the most of limited screen real estate. Customizing the prompt provides additional information and functionality with the bonus of flair. Participants will be able to take pride in custom craftsmanship with the result.
Hacks
Pamela Ocampo, Rachel Walker
Tuesday, June 24 - 02:30 PM

* Extreme Software Portability as an Art Form

Writing portable software is hard. Throw in thousands of bad and worse shared hosting configurations, a decade of technical debt, the need to cater to a sprawling ecosystem, and PHP — and you have WordPress. We've found breaking changes harm our community and unfairly punish our users, so we don't make them. But that doesn't mean we don't innovate or evolve — we're just forced to get really clever. And it works, with adoption continuing to soar.
Hacks
Andrew Nacin
Tuesday, June 24 - 03:45 PM

* The joy of volunteering with open technology and culture

Volunteering is a fun way to explore your interests and passions. In this talk, I will detail my experiences in volunteering with open projects like Wikipedia and Mozilla. I will also talk about fun ways to introduce newbies into volunteering based on my experience with conducting outreach sessions for open projects.
Culture
Netha Hussain
Tuesday, June 24 - 04:45 PM

* Performance strategies for delivering web fonts at Wikipedia scale

Wikipedia supports almost 300 languages for its multilingual content communities. As mixed script web pages become pervasive and non-Latin language content grows exponentially, a breakthrough technology of delivering webfonts on demand has been deployed across 900 Wikimedia sites. This talk discusses user benefits derived from this technological advance as well some of the performance and scalability improvements made to deliver fonts at Wikipedia scale.
Chemistry
Alolita Sharma
Wednesday, June 25 - 10:00 AM

* Network Science for Fun and Profit

Understanding the relationships between data elements has become increasingly valuable, as LinkedIn, Facebook and Google illustrate. Network science provides a means to understand, explain, predict and otherwise utilize these relationships. I will provide a brief overview of network science, with examples and illustrations using R, focused on providing an entry point to their use for fun and profit.
Cooking
John Taylor
Wednesday, June 25 - 01:30 PM

* IPv6 for Programmers

IPv4 is running out of addresses. IPv6 is the Internet Protocol which gives plenty of addresses for the future. It is starting to be deployed widely and open source applications and programming languages need to support it.
Chemistry
Ian Burrell
Wednesday, June 25 - 02:30 PM

* Make your wireless router route (or anything else) the way you want it to, with OpenWrt.

How to build an OpenWrt image from source to do just what you want it to on your suitably chosen hardware.
Cooking
Russell Senior
Wednesday, June 25 - 03:45 PM

* Futel: the future of the past of telephony

Futel is more than a collection of payphones installed in publicly accessible locations. Find out what we hope to achieve by starting a free telephone network.
Hacks
Karl Anderson
Wednesday, June 25 - 04:45 PM

* How I Learned Haskell by Writing Tiny Games

Earlier this year, I started teaching myself Haskell by using it to write short, text-based games. In this session I'll share what I learned, both about Haskell and about learning new things.
Hacks
Moss Collum
Thursday, June 26 - 10:00 AM

* Making Your Privacy Software Usable

Privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), like onion routing, PGP, and OTR often achieve a high level of security, but user experience (UX) built on top of the protocols is often a development afterthought. Without a concerted effort to examine how the system is used, people accidentally compromise their data or never attempt to use PETs. This talk will show you PET design done right and wrong through the lens of standard UX evaluation techniques. Our goal is to enable you to incorporate UX principles into your hacking from day 0.
Chemistry
Jen Davidson, Sean McGregor
Thursday, June 26 - 11:00 AM

* Extending Gems - Patterns and Anti-Patterns of Pluggable Gems

The Ruby community has a strong tradition of building extensions to popular gems. But simple mistakes can make gems harder to extend than they need to be. Drawing from real-world examples, we'll examine the patterns of coding, configuration and documentation for maximizing your gem's flexibility.
Chemistry
Jason Clark
Thursday, June 26 - 01:30 PM

* Trust, Community, and Automatic Updates

WordPress shipped in October what is perhaps its most polarizing feature ever — automatic updates in the background of self-hosted web software, on by default and no easy way to turn it off. In most open source communities, this would be cause for open revolt. Learn how through trust, communication, and a steadfast commitment to its philosophies, the WordPress core team convinced a skeptical community to go along, even if it meant users giving up some control.
Culture
Andrew Nacin
Thursday, June 26 - 02:30 PM

* Data, Privacy, & Trust in Open Source: 10 Lessons from Wikipedia

Few people today are not concerned with the way data is used to enhance or subvert individual privacy. This is especially true on the Web, where open source technologies are behind much of what we interact with and use on a daily basis. As the most fundamental aspects of our lives become networked -- social relationships, work, finance, and even how we get our food -- how can we make sure that open source technologies foster a sense of trust with users, protect their privacy, and still give data scientists the tools they need to gain insight?
Culture
Steven Walling
Thursday, June 26 - 03:45 PM

* Who broke the code? Finding problems quickly in a quickly evolving opensource project

In this talk, we will overview the 0day kernel test infrastructure, an Intel project where the goal is to ensure the quality of Linux upstream and developmental kernels. The project runs 7x24 tests on bleeding edge code from 300+ kernel git trees.
Chemistry
Timothy Chen
Thursday, June 26 - 04:45 PM

* Building a Translucent Mobile Crypto Currency with Couchbase Lite JSON Sync

Web of Trust with JSON Sync
Hacks
J Chris Anderson