B302/303

Sessions for this room

Tuesday, June 24 - 10:00 AM

* Working Effectively with People in Government on Open Source Projects

Ever thought about ways to use your open source skills to improve your city? In this session we'll talk about successful models for working with people in government, from pitching your project, communicating effectively, finding experts, tracking down data, to launching in the community.
Culture
Jason Denizac
Tuesday, June 24 - 11:00 AM

* Code review for Open Source

Everyone knows that code quality is important, but what can we do to actually ensure that our codebases meet the standards we'd like? This talk dives into how to implement code review in your project. What do patch authors need to do, what do patch reviewers need to do, what strategies can you implement to get the best results, and how can you leverage code review to grow your community?
Culture
Alex Gaynor
Tuesday, June 24 - 01:30 PM

* Build your own exobrain

Online services like "If This Then That" (IFTTT) are great for automating your life. However they provide limited ways for the end-user to add their own services, and often require credentials that one may normally wish to keep secret. The 'exobrain' project allows for service integration and extension on a machine *you* control.
Cooking
Paul Fenwick
Tuesday, June 24 - 02:30 PM

* Crash Course in Tech Management

Managing is a skill which you can master just as you did programming. This session will introduce you to many of the skills and resources you’ll need to become a successful tech manager (and keep your team from wanting to string you up).
Business
VM Brasseur
Tuesday, June 24 - 03:45 PM

* Life-Hacking and Personal Time Management for the Rest of Us

Almost all the books and articles out there about taking Agile methods into your personal life seem geared to people who have control over their schedules. What about those of us who have childcare, eldercare, or other incompressible schedule demands?
Hacks
H. Waterhouse
Tuesday, June 24 - 04:45 PM

* Patents are for babies: what every engineer should know about IP law

Don't leave IP law to the lawyers! Intellectual property law is a minefield wrapped in straightjacket sprinkled with arsenic-laced gumdrops. Invented for lawyers by lawyers, IP law makes many engineers resentful and dismissive. And yet most of us don't know enough about the details to protect ourselves and our own creations. This session will increase your understanding of how copyrights, patents, trademarks, trade secrets, and open source licensing protect you, your code, your company, and your community.
Business
Belinda Runkle
Wednesday, June 25 - 10:00 AM

* OpenStreetWhat? Mapping The World With Open Data

Come learn about OpenStreetMap, a Wikipedia-like project with over one million contributors aiming to map the entire world. We'll talk about the project, the data, and how to do some cool things with it.
Cooking
Justin Miller, Rafa Gutierrez
Wednesday, June 25 - 01:30 PM

* The Keys to Working Remotely

When I tell people I work from home, they tend to assume I spend the day playing with my dog outside. It's beyond comprehension to most that I actually spend as much time working as they do, sometimes more. I hope to enlighten those close-minded people about the possibilities working from home offers and how to do it well. Session slides: http://www.carsonshold.com/talks/keys-to-working-remotely/
Culture
Carson Shold
Wednesday, June 25 - 02:30 PM

* Math vs. Mathematics

Most people got through their high school math classes by memorizing nonsensical statements and regurgitating them on command. If you came out of that class hating math, no one would blame you, especially not a mathematician. However, that class didn't teach Intro to Algebra, it taught Intermediate Following Instructions.
Chemistry
Georgia Reh, Jenner Hanni
Wednesday, June 25 - 03:45 PM

* Advanced Javascript Basics for Web Developers

Javascript is a necessity for modern web development. Whether it is to add more interactivity to your user interface, or provide a client to interact with your API, chances are, even if you're trying to avoid working in javascript, you're working in javascript. Projects like Coffeescript and Opal, while useful, still do not help understand the javascript outputted by these compile-able languages. One growing concern in this realm is that an application's javascript can sometimes be a security concern, easily exploited by a malicious user. In order to catch these concerns, you must know what your javascript does, inside and out. This talk will illustrate concepts to make sure your client code is secure, while still giving your team the flexibility it needs to keep building your stellar app!
Chemistry
Lauren Voswinkel
Wednesday, June 25 - 04:45 PM

* DIY User Research for Open Source Projects

Open source is only about open code, right? Wrong. Interviews, questionnaires, quick usability tests, and many other research types all have a place in the open source development process. With a few easy steps and a set of scripts to follow, your community can make user research an easy and essential component of your open source project.
Culture
Erin Richey
Thursday, June 26 - 10:00 AM

* Unicorns Are People, Too: Re-Thinking Soft and Hard Skills

As developers, we tend to value hard skills that can be quantified or measured objectively. Job postings search for unicorns, but we are people first and foremost and being human isn't as easy as programming. While the code comes easily, the soft skills that make us human are complicated and difficult to get right. This talk will explore the danger of neglecting so-called "soft" skills, what we stand to lose by overvaluing technical skills, and alternatives to the hard and soft dichotomy.
Culture
Liz Abinante
Thursday, June 26 - 11:00 AM

* Modernizing a Stagnant Toolbox

WordPress turned 10 years old in May of 2013. On that day, the main repo didn't contain a single tool to make it easier for developers to work with and contribute code. Over the last year, this is how and why we changed all that.
Hacks
Aaron Jorbin
Thursday, June 26 - 01:30 PM

* Hacking In-Group Bias for Fun and Profit

Our lives and social interactions are governed by sociology and psychology. As geeks, we strive to understand how the technology around us works, and we strive to find ways to make it better. Society is basically one big, complex piece of technology, and, like all technology, it is hackable. This talk will explain how you can do that.
Culture
Kat Toomajian
Thursday, June 26 - 02:30 PM

* Deconstructing Open Source Contributions

Everyone wants to make contributing to open source projects more accessible and fun. But how do we do that? One way is to analyze past contributions to identify potential obstacles and opportunities for intervention and support. This workshop will use our own experiences as contributors to explore how the process works, using a simple but effective reflective activity.
Culture
Shauna Gordon-McKeon
Thursday, June 26 - 03:45 PM

* Distributed Agile Development or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Remoties

This is the story of how the mobile web engineering team at the Wikimedia Foundation became an extremely high-functioning and successful agile team: by embracing - rather than shying away from - a distributed model. This talk will explore the agile team's journey and how we cope with the inherent tension of remoteness and the agile principle, 'The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation'.
Culture
Arthur Richards
Thursday, June 26 - 04:45 PM

* Open Hardware from Breadboard to PCB

So you've built a breadboard circuit with wires everywhere. What's next? A printed circuit board! I'll talk about your open hardware development options through the lens of my recent project turning a breadboard prototype into a finished Arduino shield for a curing oven at Portland State.
Cooking
Jenner Hanni