Culture track

Give us your people recipes! What makes open technology and culture communities effective? Demonstrate how you motivate people to work together well.
Give us your people recipes! What makes open technology and culture communities effective? Demonstrate how you motivate people to work together well. Example topics from the past include “’Why did you do that?’ You’re more automated than you think.” and “Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls.”

Sessions for this track

* !done - Hacking IRC Bots for Distributed Teams

When our company was acquired we needed a way to see everything that was done each day all in one place. Teams were using different methods to do this: standups, written reports, emails and meetings. Nothing stuck. Done reports introduces a simple IRC command: !done. Team members say !done and what they just did. These !dones are put into a daily report. !done becomes a part of everyday at work, not a strained task that’s easily forgotten.
Culture
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* Agile from the Open Source Trenches: Making agile work for Wikipedia engineering teams

Wikipedia’s innovative language and mobile engineering projects use agile development to create high-quality features and apps in faster iterations. This talk examines what works and what doesn’t when using agile development for large open source projects. This talk will help developers and engineering managers better implement a successful agile process for their open source projects.
Culture
Alolita Sharma

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper

* Citizenship Online: Open Source Politics

Online deliberation refers to applications which help communities make decisions. This varies from Exploratory deliberation, like Amazon reviews, where an individual makes a decision by consulting their community, to very structured Decision Making deliberations where a community needs to forge a single legally and logically defensible decision.
Culture
Ele Munjeli

* Clone A Git Together Into Your Town

Git is used everywhere, but few structured communities or groups exist. Learn about the PDX Git Together and how to clone this community model into your town.
Culture
Duke Leto

* Data journalism

We're creating educational materials for the next generation of news-application developers to dig into open data and open government.
Culture
DAVID STANTON

* Designgineering

Open source software engineering and user interface design got off on the wrong foot. Sadly it’s holding our projects back from reaching their full potential. Let’s talk about how we can bring these seemingly incompatible disciplines together in perfect harmony by simply learning each other’s craft, and how to get started doing so. Whether you are an engineer or a designer you will learn where to get started and how to have fun doing it.
Culture
Trevor Parscal

* Diversity in open source: What's changed in 2012 and 2013

A few stories we will cover: * 20% women attendees at PyCon US 2013 * 85% of JSConf attendees donated to women in open tech/culture * The success of Black Girls Code * Conferences with 100% white male speakers are now called out for not trying hard enough to find good speakers * Mozilla's adoption of community guidelines that prevent advocacy of discrimination on Planet Mozilla and other Mozilla forums * The rapid growth of PyLadies
Culture
Valerie Aurora, Sumana Harihareswara, Ashe Dryden, Liz Henry, Asheesh Laroia

* DIY: Creativity and Open Source

Panelists will discuss their uses of open source tools in creative applications, from design to art to hardware.
Culture
Melissa Chavez, Sarah Sharp, Cloë Latchkey, Cameron Adamez

* Expanding Your Empathy

I believe empathy is the core competency that is missing from much of the efforts to push the tech community in a direction towards more diversity of all kinds. Companies, communities and conferences cannot expect everything to magically change until they're willing to go deep and examine the systemic patterns and structures that keep underrepresented communities from feeling safe and welcome in the tech space.
Culture
Kronda Adair

* FAIL is Not a Four-Letter Word

Projects fail. Companies crash and burn. Screws fall out all the time; the world is an imperfect place. Just because it happens doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prevent it or—at the very least—to minimize the damage when it does. As a matter of fact, embracing failure can be one of the best things you do for your organization.
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Failure and Wikipedia: how encyclopedias work

This talk is about my experience with promoting Wikipedia in Indian languages, OpenGLAM projects in India and the problems I've encountered. I also want to draw parallels to how the encyclopedia project itself, especially online works on notions of rough consensus, thereby articulating a specific political position for the community and reflecting a world view through the knowledge they produce.
Culture
noopur raval

* Geek Choir - Fast!

A hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture
Michael Alan Brewer

* Hacking the academic experience

When I was asked to teach Ruby on Rails at Columbia University I observed that a significant number of the skills required to become a successful professional in the industry are acquired on the job and aren’t being taught in school.
Culture
Emily Stolfo

* How My Kids Are Learning to Program By Talking

My children have patiently tolerated a number of teach-STEM-quick schemes their dad has brought home. They've taught robots to dance, created simple animations using Scratch, and, quite frankly, made a lot of poop jokes. What's missing from these programming tools was storytelling. The ones we tried focused either on easy interactivity or expressive power. If only there were a way to combine the two... oh, wait, there was—46 years ago!
Culture
Ian Dees

* Human Interfaces for Geeks

As technical professionals we excel at understanding protocols, standards, file-formats, and APIs. Whenever there is a doubt as to the correct way to do things, one merely needs to read the fine manual or source code. Unfortunately the reference manual for humans was lost a long time ago, and the source code is poorly documented. We've been struggling with inter-human communication ever since. Paul Fenwick will present his findings at reverse-engineering the human communication protocol.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* It's OK to be Average

Open Source communities are often full of "the one who invented ___" people. They've written RFCs, gotten patents, published software that's already installed on every computer you'll ever buy. It can be kind of intimidating. But there's room for more than that--and welcoming more people can improve your project exponentially!
Culture
Noirin Plunkett

* Just Don't Lick the Cookie: an open discussion about organizational dysfunction

When someone claims a task and then doesn't do anything with it, we call that "licking the cookie." Nobody in their right mind would pick up and eat the licked cookie or finish the project. In this session well talk about common forms of organizational dysfunction, and then facilitate a group discussion about working around, over, under or through organizational dysfunctions you've encountered.
Culture
Kellie Brownell, Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote — Alex “Skud” Bayley

Keynote by Alex “Skud” Bayley
Culture
Alex Bayley

* Kicking Impostor Syndrome In The Head

Impostor syndrome -- the persistent belief that any minute everyone around you is going to figure out you're not at all qualified -- happens to a majority of the tech industry; nobody talks about it, because nobody wants to be the first to admit it. This talk confronts that feeling head-on, and addresses ways to readjust your perceptions of your accomplishments to accurately reflect reality.
Culture
Denise Paolucci

* Lessons From X

Lessons I've learned from 25 years of participation in perhaps the longest-running end-user-facing Open Source project.
Culture
Bart Massey

* Leveling up in DevOps: the Art of Bad Shell Scripts

What are the core differences in a DevOps intern, a beginner DevOpsian, and a senior DevOpsian?
Culture
Emily Slocombe

* Morning Keynote: James Vasile

Open source!
Culture
James Vasile

* Morning Keynote: Ashe Dryden

It's been scientifically proven that more diverse communities and workplaces create better products and the solutions to difficult problems are more complete and diverse themselves. Companies are struggling to find adequate talent. So why do we see so few women, people of color, and LGBTQ people at our events and on the about pages of our websites? Even more curiously, why do 60% of women leave the tech industry within 10 years? Why are fewer women choosing to pursue computer science and related degrees than ever before? Why have stories of active discouragement, dismissal, harassment, or worse become regular news?
Culture
Ashe Dryden

* My First Year of Pull Requests

Open source folks are passionate about the tools they make and want others to get involved. Yet, in the past year that I've been developing software full time, I've seen a wide variety of responses from maintainers. On one hand, I've been inspired by the Travis-CI maintainer who followed up with my bug report over several weeks, on the other hand, my pull request to JDBC has lain fallow.
Culture
Fiona Tay

* No, I Won't Contribute to Your Open Source Project

The growth of the open community is inspiring. Yet despite this, most projects find it remarkably difficult to get people to contribute. Why?
Culture
VM Brasseur

* Open Sourcing Depression

In the spirit of open source, I'd like to shine a spotlight on depression. Not because it's easy, but because it's important. Mental illness affects many of us, but the stigma attached to it dissuades most people from talking about it openly. That's not how we make progress. With this talk, I want to do my part.
Culture
Edward Finkler

* Quantitative community management

In this talk, you will learn the state of the art in community measurement, common mistakes made in surveying, and how to actively use data to improve activity within a project.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Running with Scissors: Open Source Team Dynamics

Team dynamics are tricky. They're different when you're volunteering your time, when you're working for someone, or when you're trying to build something and invite someone else to build other good things too.
Culture
Amye Scavarda

* Sharing Beyond "Sharing": Fostering an Open Sharing Culture in the Philippines

Filipinos are known for sharing. From chain text messages, to photos, to videos, even to gossip and covering recent events in our own little communities, there seems to be an openness to sharing information: in fact, the Philippines is the so-called "social networking capital of the world". But can this openness to sharing information translate into the open source movement? I seek to provide possible answers to that question.
Culture
Josh Lim

* Simple Questions Should Have Simple Answers

What happens when a project begins to embrace the philosophy that simple questions should have simple answers? Q: Simple to whom? A: Simple to the person asking the question. "Simple questions should have simple answers" has given me a lot of design clarity in my projects. I hope to convince you of its beneficial effects.
Culture
Michael Schwern

* Smart Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Koehler

* Technology for Development—how open source is changing the developing world, and how the movement can do more

FOSS can be a power for positive social impact in the developing world. Hear about key social impact projects and how the open source community can broaden its focus beyond the needs of western developers.
Culture
Jeff Wishnie

* The Care and Feeding of Volunteers: Lessons from Non-Profits and OSS

Volunteers are the lifeblood of OSS projects. From behemoths like the Linux Foundation to every little project on SourceForge, volunteers keep things moving forward. Retaining happy and motivated volunteers is a crucial step in creating a healthy organization. In this talk, I will discuss the whys and wherefors of encouraging and directing your volunteers in the context of both traditional non-profits and OSS projects.
Culture
Kat Toomajian

* The Future of Ruby

What will Ruby, the programming language and community, look like in 2 years?
Culture
Brian Shirai

* We, the people.

Its a simple talk. About Us. We shall, explain things as they are around us, how we got into the community, give suggestions on how people can help more people get into the community from a similar environment.
Culture
Sucheta Ghoshal, Harsh Kothari

* Where "Small is Beautiful" meets "Big Data"- Empowering Local Communities with Open Hardware

"The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed" - Author William Gibson Whether rightly or wrongly so, it has been argued that the "information revolution' has resulted in a wider gap between those with skills and access to digital resources and those who do not. The same can apply to entire communities where language, geography and cultural barriers have created a new world of "Have Nots". The growing civic hacker movement is making long strides towards eliminating the "silicon ceiling" effect, but thanks to the emerging practice of "open hardware" the "civic hacker" is joined by a new class known as the "maker"... The civic hacker is capable of great things, and already has enough of a track record to be proud of. But the hacker ultimately is, and should remain, part of a vanguard elite who like the Bletchley Park codebreakers of WWII possess skills of such value that the work of a single individual can have a direct impact on the outcome of a war (or election...) The "Maker" on the other hand represents a fundamental break from a passive society of consumers into something more closely resembling the small-scale producers and artisans on which the U.S was based on.
Culture
Andrew Jawitz

* Zero to root in 12 months / How We Mentor “Rock Star” Students

The OSU Open Source Lab (OSUOSL) and PSU Computer Action Team (theCAT) provides an amazing program for undergraduate students to learn about system administration. Many of our students have moved on and created their own successful startups and have changed the landscape of open source themselves. This session will cover how OSUOSL and theCAT mentor our students and create rock stars in the industry.
Culture
William Van Hevelingen, Kenneth Lett, Lance Albertson, Spencer Krum

Proposals for this track

* 3 is a Magic Number

Free Software and Open Source can be a complex subject. In this session Jim distills licenses, communities, governance models and the like down to their bare essentials.
Culture 2013-03-09 16:00:13 +0000
Jim Jagielski

* A Geek's Guide to Race Walking

"It's like the gods descending from Mt. Olympus!" Okay, so your reaction to seeing race walkers might not be as dramatic as Hal's on "Malcolm in the Middle." But from the unconventional gait to the plethora of statistics, there's plenty about this sport to delight geeks. In this session, we'll tell you all about it.
Culture 2013-02-27 19:05:07 +0000
Carmen Jackinsky, Ian Dees

* Community Infrastructure in Free Software

To succeed, projects need to do so many things well, and usually they need to do them alone. This is daunting for all projects impossible for new ones. Community infrastructure will let us band together to get more projects to their goals. Here's how.
Culture 2013-03-05 19:58:16 +0000
James Vasile

* crushing data silos with ownCloud

We are heading full speed into a future where a huge piece of the personal information of the world is stored in very few centralized services. This talk will discuss the problems of a future with centralized cloud file sync and share services and will present ownCloud as a possible free software solution.
Culture 2013-03-08 10:26:34 +0000
Frank Karlitschek

* Democratization of infrastructure: Monitoring with nagios and graphite

Git is cool. Configuration is code. The simplicity of a monitoring check or metrics collector enables junior system administrators to learn in small, contained parts. Jr. admins can go from not knowing what monitoring is to having a check in production in a manner of hours.
Culture 2013-03-10 05:07:40 +0000
Spencer Krum, William Van Hevelingen

* Deploy continuously? Yes please! But how?

How do you go from deploying once a week to once an hour or more? Culture is the biggest barrier. What did New Relic do to make this work?
Culture 2013-02-09 00:26:31 +0000
Brent Miller

* Engaging sport communities through Wikimedia projects

Wikimedia is a key source of knowledge for centralized knowledge of women’s sport in Australia. There are over 1,500 articles covering some aspect of women’s sport on English Wikipedia which, if printed in a paper book, would be over 4,000 pages long. They cover a broad range of topics from competitor biographies, to team articles, to league and federation articles, to information on individual season performance, to broader topics such as specific histories of women’s sports in Australia. During the Olympic period, interest in Australian women’s sport peaked, with over 2 million total views to these articles, many of which linked back to Australian sport federation and government websites. Beyond Wikipedia, Wikimedia hosts a large number of free to use pictures on Commons and a number of stories about women’s sports have been published on Wikinews, a project that feeds to Google News. This material is re-used on sites like Facebook, linked on other sites like Twitter, and has a longer online visibility profile than traditional news sites.
Culture 2013-03-12 07:32:39 +0000
Laura Hale

* Evangelism and community outreach in the 1st century

How a local meetup with 13 participants spread across their known World in a few years, with little budget and gigantic enemies. Beyond miracles and beliefs: let’s look at the tactics and procedures that made the first Christians successful. A historical view of Acts of the Apostles for free software promoters and community managers.
Culture 2013-03-08 07:25:29 +0000
Quim Gil

* Fluff: Collaborating to Publish a Fiberarts Magazine Using Open Source Tools

The handspinning community needed an online magazine; we're using open source software to make it happen
Culture 2013-03-24 02:59:06 +0000
Rose White

* Geek Choir - Extended!

An extended, hands-on session in which we show how to increase team identity, cohesion, and collaboration via singing.
Culture 2013-03-24 02:30:00 +0000
Michael Alan Brewer

* Getting Faster: 5 People Who Sped Up Our World

Everywhere we look our world is speeding up. We have "fast food" and "speed dating". In technology we talk of "sprints", and "continuous deployment". But the search for speed is not a new one and has been going on for centuries. Spanning 300 years we'll discuss 5 people who have spent their lives making things faster and learn how we can apply these concepts to the work we're doing today.
Culture 2013-03-23 18:56:20 +0000
Alex Kroman

* Getting more women to be a part of FOSS

The FOSS statistic of male vs female contributors is really shocking and for absolutely no definite reason should this be so. Wouldn't it be fair for all and a great thing to happen if the ratio could be brought close to 50-50? Why so less number of female contributors in FOSS? What are they scared about?
Culture 2013-01-20 07:12:07 +0000
Priyanka Nag

* Hack Your Health With Open Source Tools

The DIY Health Manifesto is an empowerment manual to your own wellness minus the fear mongering and red tape of the American health care establishment. Let's examine the many ways we can measure, control and improve our own health, right here and now, using open source tools and a host of other accessible methods.
Culture 2013-03-21 22:47:47 +0000
Domenika Radonich Leto

* Handcrafted Code? The Programmer in the Age of the Artisan

Culture is diverging in serious and interesting ways. Mass-production is at an all-time high, but a parallel development praises traditional, pre-technological production practices. We lust after devices too shiny to have been made by human hands, and use them to snap photos of organic coffee we insist be roasted less than a mile away. What is the future for programmers in this age? Are we to be replaced eventually by automation, or will there always be a place for "handcrafted code"?
Culture 2013-03-09 23:42:44 +0000
Jonathan Lipps

* How to (Almost) Kill a Successful Project and then Bring It Back to Life: Lessons Learned from the Xen Project

In the decade the Xen Project has been in existence, it has seen great success. It also almost collapsed because of certain community and business decisions. We will deliver lessons learned so that other projects can avoid these pitfalls.
Culture 2013-03-09 21:18:19 +0000
Russell Pavlicek

* How We Mentor “Rock Star” Students at the OSUOSL

Over the past ten years the OSU Open Source Lab (OSUOSL) has provided an amazing program for undergraduate students. Many of our students have moved on and created their own successful startups and have changed the landscape of open source themselves. This session will cover how we mentor our students and create rock stars in the industry.
Culture 2013-03-11 00:35:56 +0000
Lance Albertson, Kenneth Lett

* Licensing Your Open Source Project

What are the differences between the MIT license and the BSD license? How do you know whether the GPL is compatible with your project and its libraries? What license should you pick for contributors and users? Learn the differences between the major open source licenses and their uses, plus the one license that you shouldn't use if you want major adoption of your work.
Culture 2013-03-06 16:36:49 +0000
Brandon Savage

* Old-school testing that is relevant today

What is an equivalence class? Imagine that you have a function that takes an integer parameter between 1 and 12. The integers from 2 to 11 are in the same class; you probably don't need to test more than one of them. 1 and 12 are boundary values, but they're at opposite ends so you should probably test both. 0 and 13 and negative integers all belong to the same class, "out of range". What other classes might be relevant when testing this function?
Culture 2013-03-09 23:02:43 +0000
Kurt Sussman

* Open Source and Feelings: Maintenance as Empathy Work

"Maintainers shouldn't be passive, otherwise the project can lack vision, and being aggressive risks alienating new contributors. An assertive maintainer can make the project fun for contributors while retaining a sense of purpose and direction."
Culture 2013-03-10 00:40:40 +0000
Strand McCutchen

* Open Source Mentor-ship

Contributing to an open source project goes beyond coding. A programmer has to adapt the processes, tools and culture of the project. This adaption can prove to be a challenge and makes a number of people shy off from contributing. Having someone to hold your hand makes the adaption very smooth!
Culture 2013-03-20 12:22:23 +0000
Martha Chumo

* Opposing Authority in Open Source

In this talk I'll showcase insights we can garner from left wing anti-establishment movements such as community radio stations, unions and cooperatives and how you can use those techniques to grow, scale and manage open source communities, while still dismantling the authority.
Culture 2013-03-08 22:08:57 +0000
Francesca Krihely

* Put people first: Navigating the bazaar of open source libraries

npm has almost 25,000 packages. CPAN has over 114,000 modules. Drupal has over 20,000 add-ons, and there are 23,000+ plugins just at Wordpress.org. Where does one start? Put people first.
Culture 2013-03-10 05:12:51 +0000
Rob Martin

* Put the "Ops" in "Dev": What Developers Need to Know About DevOps

With so many tools to insulate us, its difficult to see that luxury can come with hidden costs. Those hidden costs may include security, performance, scalability and maintainability. Startups may let developers lay down the infrastructure which can create some major headaches down the road if done incorrectly.
Culture 2013-03-11 00:24:12 +0000
Lance Albertson, Kenneth Lett, Justin Dugger, Rudy Grigar

* Pythonic Andragogy (Python for Adults)

You've heard of kids using turtle graphics. Lets talk about "tractor graphics" in a hypothetical Python course from a possible future.
Culture 2013-03-20 21:07:01 +0000
Kirby Urner

* Tech, Bikes, Transit & Lifestyle Options to improve your Programming

I'll be diving deep to discuss the benefits of living well to do better programming. I'll talk about the statistics and data behind dropping the auto-dependent mindset and stepping into the world of cycling, meetups, urban living, clean eating and ways to dramatically improve your innovation, entrepreneurial activities and why these things are connected. As I like to say, "How to get and stay at 100%."
Culture 2013-01-17 22:11:34 +0000
Adron Hall

* Ten years of FOSS hosting at the OSU Open Source Lab

For the past ten years the OSU Open Source Lab has provided hosting for 150 open source projects from around the world. This session will cover a historical background of the past ten years, an overview of the types of projects we host, what types of hosting we provide, what tools we use and how we provide the hosting. Our audience should be people interested in what's happening at the OSUOSL.
Culture 2013-02-16 05:45:59 +0000
Lance Albertson

* The Apache Way

The Apache Software Foundation is likely the most successful Open Source community out there. In this session, Jim will describe the basic tenets of how Apache projects work: The Apache Way
Culture 2013-03-09 16:04:56 +0000
Jim Jagielski

* The Case for Everyday Crypto

Personal encryption is dearly needed in an increasingly surveilled world. I will talk about the user experience problems and lack of education that prevent widespread adoption and habit-forming of secure communication and circumvention software tools.
Culture 2013-03-30 23:53:18 +0000
Wesley Chen

* The Fourth 'R'

As technology continues to grow at an increasing rate, why is our educational system stuck in a pre-technology age? Why is programming rarely taught even at the higher levels of schooling? Why do stereotypes of the isolated, nerdy programmer continue to linger, driving away smart, creative people from computer science degrees?
Culture 2013-03-24 05:17:42 +0000
Davy Stevenson

* The intersection of software and education (with discussion)

How do you build a better engineer? What tools and approaches are out there today? Where might we be going in the future? Presentation then discussion.
Culture 2013-03-22 03:50:41 +0000
Colin Dabritz

* What Hath Von Neumann Wrought?

I've sub-titled this presentation "skeptical musings of a reluctant cyborg." I'm mostly going to talk about computational journalism, but don't be surprised if some science fiction finds its way into the discussion.
Culture 2013-03-24 03:38:55 +0000
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* What Science Fiction Can Teach Us About Building Communities

Helpful tips about participating in and building open source communities as told through examples of what we can learn about communities from science fiction.
Culture 2013-03-13 15:11:44 +0000
Dawn Foster

* What's in it for me?

Having worked closely with Indian Wikimedia Community this talk aims to discuss real world scenarios like "Why should I contribute to it"? "What's in it for me"? To sustain any FOSS Community one has to answer these questions. This talk will be about trying to answer this unique question "What's in it for me"?
Culture 2013-03-11 22:11:45 +0000
Arnav Sonara

* Why Should a Student Click that "EDIT" Button?

Why should a student click that EDIT button? I would like to discuss how contributing to various Wikimedia Project benefits the students and why they should care about it.
Culture 2013-03-15 19:05:36 +0000
Arnav Sonara

* Women & Computing

Before there were even computers to program women were making exiciting advances in computing. In the 1800s Ada Lovelace wrote the first computer program. She died before the computer was completed, but when her program was eventually ran it Just Worked™! The gender imbalance in computing is a problem. We all know software engineers are shaping the future. Women need to be part of the discussion.
Culture 2013-03-22 04:34:06 +0000
Jessica Lynn Suttles

* Zero to root in 12 months: Training and Utilizing Student Administrators in Higher Education

In this session you will learn how the Computer Action Team teaches the next generation of system administrators.
Culture 2013-02-12 22:50:14 +0000
William Van Hevelingen, Spencer Krum