B304

Open Source Bridge 2013 Birds of a Feather

Proposals for this room

* Geeks and Depression: Blue Hackers BoF (Confirmed)

Lots of geeks have depression. Come talk about what helps you overcome your depression, and learn about bluehackers.org
BOF 2013-06-11 14:35:27 +0000
Sarah Sharp

Open Source Bridge 2013

Sessions for this room

Tuesday, June 18 - 10:00 AM

* How Good is My Business Idea? Strategic Analysis for Techies

We'll look at methods for evaluating business ideas with a focus on business strategy. We will see how building a business on Open Source changes the equation and will look at the many mistakes I made with Elevated Code.
Business
Mike Mangino
Tuesday, June 18 - 01:30 PM

* The Perl Renaissance

The Perl Renaissance is in full swing. Join internationally acclaimed speaker and White Camel Award winner Paul Fenwick as we explore some of the most freakin' amazing developments in the land of Perl!
Chemistry
Paul Fenwick
Tuesday, June 18 - 02:30 PM

* Bugs, bugs, bugs!

Bugmasters from Wikimedia, Mozilla, and GNOME argue entertainingly about bug management. We shall reveal our best Bugzilla hacks as well as waxing philosophical about open source project developer communities!
Culture
Liz Henry, Andre Klapper
Tuesday, June 18 - 04:45 PM

* Data & Applications Across the Void :: Distributing Systems

I'll be covering the technology that is now being used for the largest scale systems and how that technology is used, how it is connected, and how it keeps large volumes of data available for everything from genomic research, mass e-commerce processing or keeping medical data safe from loss.
Cooking
Adron Hall
Wednesday, June 19 - 10:00 AM

* Training the trainers

This long session is a tutorial, with exercises, on how to run welcoming, effective outreach events targeted at bringing newcomers into your communities.
Cooking
Asheesh Laroia
Wednesday, June 19 - 01:30 PM

* HOWTO on secure software design with threat modeling

Leigh tells you things about security.
Chemistry
Leigh Honeywell
Wednesday, June 19 - 02:30 PM

* Beginning Functional Programming in Scala

Have you heard about functional programming but not sure what all the fuss is about? Learn about the basic concepts of functional programming, writing functions in Scala, and the functional approach to working with collections supported by Scala's collections library. Learn about the benefits of a functional approach to programming even when you're not fully adopting a functional style. Scala is a language that allows mixing the object-oriented and functional approaches. No prior knowledge of Scala is required to enjoy this talk.
Chemistry
Michael Pigg
Wednesday, June 19 - 03:45 PM

* Zero to root in 12 months / How We Mentor “Rock Star” Students

The OSU Open Source Lab (OSUOSL) and PSU Computer Action Team (theCAT) provides an amazing program for undergraduate students to learn about system administration. Many of our students have moved on and created their own successful startups and have changed the landscape of open source themselves. This session will cover how OSUOSL and theCAT mentor our students and create rock stars in the industry.
Culture
William Van Hevelingen, Kenneth Lett, Lance Albertson, Spencer Krum
Wednesday, June 19 - 04:45 PM

* Bitcoin and the Law - Whither Transactions?

How does Bitcoin interact with the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act and other laws regulating ecommerce? Do those acts even contemplate a decentralized currency? Where do we go from here?
Business
J-P Voilleque
Thursday, June 20 - 10:00 AM

* Technology for Development—how open source is changing the developing world, and how the movement can do more

FOSS can be a power for positive social impact in the developing world. Hear about key social impact projects and how the open source community can broaden its focus beyond the needs of western developers.
Culture
Jeff Wishnie
Thursday, June 20 - 01:30 PM

* Conducting Your Open Source Project

How are open source projects like symphonies? In this session, we will review leadership strategies and insights gained from conducting non-profit amateur performing ensembles. We will discuss how to coordinate and lead teams of volunteers in both top-down and self-governing organizations.
Business
Michael Alan Brewer
Thursday, June 20 - 02:30 PM

* Let The Internet Work For You

Creating a successful Open Source project isn’t intuitive, or easy. Converting a brilliant idea into a working code base, then publishing it to Github (with significant adoption) is hard enough, nevermind building an ideal development and release workflow. Sometimes, getting your OSS code out to the community is the easy part -- then the real work ensues. Juggling between the roles of; creator, maintainer and contributor while managing the interests of the group effort (IRC, mailing lists etc) and issue trackers can quickly scale from simple and exciting, to a time consuming full time job. I plan to take you on a ride, demonstrating how Open Source developers can leverage free service offerings (for open source) to make your life as a project maintainer easier and more rewarding; from development and QA automation through to continuous deployment.
Cooking
Sebastian Tiedtke
Thursday, June 20 - 03:45 PM

* Data journalism

We're creating educational materials for the next generation of news-application developers to dig into open data and open government.
Culture
DAVID STANTON
Thursday, June 20 - 04:45 PM

* Where "Small is Beautiful" meets "Big Data"- Empowering Local Communities with Open Hardware

"The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed" - Author William Gibson Whether rightly or wrongly so, it has been argued that the "information revolution' has resulted in a wider gap between those with skills and access to digital resources and those who do not. The same can apply to entire communities where language, geography and cultural barriers have created a new world of "Have Nots". The growing civic hacker movement is making long strides towards eliminating the "silicon ceiling" effect, but thanks to the emerging practice of "open hardware" the "civic hacker" is joined by a new class known as the "maker"... The civic hacker is capable of great things, and already has enough of a track record to be proud of. But the hacker ultimately is, and should remain, part of a vanguard elite who like the Bletchley Park codebreakers of WWII possess skills of such value that the work of a single individual can have a direct impact on the outcome of a war (or election...) The "Maker" on the other hand represents a fundamental break from a passive society of consumers into something more closely resembling the small-scale producers and artisans on which the U.S was based on.
Culture
Andrew Jawitz