Culture track

What makes open source work? What else does the open source ethic lead us to do?
Open source ideas affect things beyond our software, from group organization to creative projects to how we share knowledge. Organizations from the personal to the governmental are influenced by this movement. Even inside open source, we wonder what it can teach us about our groups’ structures, and inclusiveness versus exclusivity. Tell us how open source can inform the entire world and promote transparency in all aspects of life. Example topics from the past include “’Why did you do that?’ You’re more automated than you think.” and “Seven Habits Of Highly Obnoxious Trolls.”

Sessions for this track

* 29 Ways to Get Started in Open Source Today

Learn how to get started in open source. You can help your favorite open source project, even if you don't think you're "a good enough programmer". You just have to know where to start, and here you'll learn 29 different starting points where you can pitch in and make a difference in the software that you use every day.
Culture
Asheesh Laroia

* Anti-Censorship Best Practices: How to Make Keeping it up Easy and Taking it Down Hard

What do bananas have to do with censorship? What do polyamorous people have in common with fax machines? How can you help your ideas have cyber-sex? In this far-reaching seminar, join Social Justice Technologist and free software developer maymay as he explains the 101's of how to make keeping your content up easy and taking it down hard. More important than merely a crash-course on tools, learn the fundamentals of how to build anti-censorship techniques directly into your publishing process using nothing more technologically complex than copy-and-paste. Whether you're a non-technical individual or a savvy multi-national organization, you'll discover how you can put data portability, distributed publishing, and censorship circumvention tactics to use right away in order to stay one step ahead of those who would call you "obscene."
Culture
Meitar Moscovitz

* Bring Out the GIMP, Open Source Art Programs and Their Value in Both Tech and the Professional Artist Community

We have come to a point where nearly everyone is expected to have at least cursory knowledge of graphics applications, and rather than shell out $650 for a program you’re primarily interested in using for editing screenshots many in the tech community knows to download GIMP and use that $650 to fuel their caffeine and online gaming addictions. Unfortunately this is not the case with artists. From the moment you enter art school you’re chained to proprietary applications and I know I don’t have to proselytize to you lot about that. So we end up with one group of people being paid to use a free program for the most rudimentary of tasks and we have a second group of people who could be exploiting the most bleeding edge features of that program, but who are instead spending money they don’t have on products they may not need. There’s also the option to pirate those applications, but that’s a whole other talk.
Culture
Cloë Latchkey

* Easy Beats Open: The Challenge of Growing Open Source

"Open Source, in its majestic equality, guarantees both programmers and non-programmers alike the right to alter and recompile their software." The battle for Open Source Legitimacy is largely over: in many sectors, it's actually the preferred alternative. In the task-focused world that most casual computer users inhabit, however, "open-ness" is a meaningless abstraction and the walled gardens of closed source competitors offer compelling advantages. In this session, I'll explore the reasons that people make their choices, point out why "moral arguments" about open source are unlikely to change those choices, and discuss ways that our communities can further the ideals of Open Source without demonizing Grandpa's iPad.
Culture
Jeff Eaton

* How to Win Collaborators and Influence Community: Encouraging (& Not Discouraging) Novice Coders

Interested in helping others learn to code? How do you help give them a running start, without throwing roadblocks in their way? Come get better at helping other people get better.
Culture
Liene Verzemnieks

* Keynote by Sumana Harihareswara

Sumana Harihareswara gave our opening keynote, "Be Bold: An Origin Story".
Culture
Sumana Harihareswara

* Keynote: Fear, Uncertainty, and Dopamine

Beer, cookies, psychopathy, happiness, regret—these are all things the world's greatest scientists have studied in detail. Learn how humans work, and how to get the most out of interacting with them.
Culture
Paul Fenwick

* Keynote: Open Source, Open Hostility, Open Doors

Jason Scott, a member of the activist preservation group Archive Team, describes how open source projects and outlook have helped and improved the achieving of the group's goals.
Culture
Jason Scott

* Logic Lessons That Last Generations

In the 1980s, my grandfather reached onto the bookshelves of his cigar-smoke-seasoned garage laboratory and pulled down a three-ring binder that would change my life. Come hear how a 50-year-old introduction to binary logic has managed to stay relevant after all these decades, and what it means for our own efforts to teach and document technical subjects.
Culture
Ian Dees

* Open Education Tools for Mentoring and Learning

The internet is full of information. Some of this information was made to help people learn. A subset exists under open licenses. These open educational resources (OERs) are used all over the world for learning and teaching. This talk will cover what some of them are and explore ways they have been (and can be) used for mentors and self-learners--both as individuals and in peer-study groups.
Culture
Molly de Blanc

* Painting the Bikeshed: Lessons from A Drupal 8 Initiative Lead

In March of 2011 I was named by Drupal project lead Dries Buytaert as lead of an initiative to improve configuration management for the next release. This talk will discuss how I went from lone coder to community leader and some of the lessons I learned along the way.
Culture
Greg Dunlap

* Rise of the Indie Web

Meet the pioneers of the new Indie Web, learn what's changed, and how you too can reclaim your content, your data, your online identity. Join our panelists as they debate a variety of different approaches and learn how you too can get started and join the new Indie Web.
Culture
Tantek Çelik

* Supporting Oregon K-12 Education with Open Source

How a partnership between the Oregon Department of Education and Oregon State University is using open source technology to help Oregon's K-12 teachers.
Culture
Greg Lund-Chaix

* Text Lacks Empathy

Have you ever written a nice friendly email and gotten a reply that seems like they read a whole different email? Textual communication has special problems. This talk will help you mitigate them: ensuring that what you mean to say is what is understood; interpreting messages that seem totally out of whack; and increasing empathic bandwidth.
Culture
Michael Schwern, Noirin Plunkett

* Thriving in Chaos: An Introduction to Systems Thinking

For centuries we have learned to solve problems with a linear approach. This originated with Isaac Newton in the sevententh century and assumes that everything in the world is connected through cause and effect. Systems thinking throws away that assumption and examines the universe as small pieces connected into a complex network. You will learn how a systems thinking approach can be used to create robust groups that don't have leaders.
Culture
Alex Kroman

* Why You Need to Host 100 New Wikis Just for Yourself

The Federated Wiki offers a new form of conversation well suited for charting our collective future.
Culture
Ward Cunningham

* Wise Asana

Yoga returns to Open Source Bridge! Come with your stiff shoulders, sore wrists, tight hips and aching back. Leave with ideas on how to incorporate 5 minutes of practice into your busy day to care for your body and mind.
Culture
Sherri Montgomery

Proposals for this track

* API-driven Internal Dashboard -- The devops.json and Gutsy open source projects

Many large systems are composed of smaller, API-driven services. In these service oriented architectures (SOA), developers work in small subteams consuming and producing abstractions. While APIs enhance development efficiency in the normal work-flow, failure cases are often non-standardized, with little to no information provided for operational and development issues such as downtime or developer on-boarding. Implementing internal devops.json endpoints, combined with the Gutsy DevOps Dashboard, significantly improves the cost and quality of outcomes to operational and development problems by enabling information discovery of people and infrastructure.
Culture 2012-03-09 17:04:27 +0000
Lucy Mendel

* Back to Making the Future: Recovering from Data Addiction

Spending our time consuming data lets us get really effective at it, but every optimization has a cost. By optimizing for consumption, we sacrifice our ability to create.
Culture 2012-03-16 05:42:54 +0000
Pieter van de Bruggen

* Being the new sheriff^W barkeep in town

What are the special challenges for a new community manager stepping into a long-established open source community?
Culture 2012-03-16 20:54:47 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara

* Better Support Living through Software aka Make your own support workflow

Just say no to aimless, time wasting support forum browsing; the 1990s are over! Make your own awesome customized support flow.
Culture 2012-03-16 20:37:18 +0000
Roland Tanglao

* Catalyzing Org Change With Open Source Software

You found the right open source solution for your new client. You create an amazingly beautiful, technically awesome, super-sophisticated piece of coding wizardry that borderlines on semantic web poetry. You deliver it to them on time, on budget and it works. The next day you get a phone call and it's DOA. WTF???
Culture 2012-03-31 00:21:47 +0000
Todd Pitt

* Commercial, open source and community; is it an oxymoron?

Panel discussion on the viability and strategies around commercial open source communities.
Culture 2012-03-31 03:21:05 +0000
John Mertic

* Defining a Common Community Platform

Panel on discussing platforms for use with the community now and the future.
Culture 2012-03-31 03:18:49 +0000
John Mertic

* Education and participation: students + open source projects = win-win!

In lots of lectures, students work on imaginary projects just for the sake of learning something. Or they can choose what they work on – mostly That Popular Proprietary Software™ which does not care about their contributions. We need to change that.
Culture 2012-03-31 06:48:56 +0000
Jan-Christoph Borchardt

* Fighting meatware bit-rot at your desk

Sitting with your arms and attention forward shortens and tightens your pectorals, and doing nothing with your upper back unbalances the muscles that keep the bones in your shoulders and arms aligned. This makes your shoulders easier to to injure during your frisbee golf game. So let's do something to engage your upper back. This will also give you a sense of how your back and shoulders might feel when your upper body posture is aligned...
Culture 2012-01-19 18:19:21 +0000
Kurt Sussman

* Freedom to Connect: Non-monogamy as a Human Internet of Compassion-Moving Devices

Although few people seem to realize it, the Internet is a very sexual technology. It functions using the same principle as love: abundance is more valuable than scarcity. Social behaviors are influenced by the technologies we have available, but the technologies we have available are also influenced by social behaviors, or embedded cultural scripts. How would Western society change if the “pair-bonded sexual-romantic couple” were no longer its central organizing social construct? In this session, explore the myriad ways polyamory's key tenet—that a relationship involving more than two individuals is a good and valuable thing—was influenced by and can be applied to everything from social media marketing, social justice activism, and, of course, encouraging participation in free, libre, and open source software projects.
Culture 2012-03-13 23:32:33 +0000
Meitar Moscovitz

* Handcrafted Code: The Device Paradigm and Implications for Developers

The Technological Age has seen the reshaping of the physical and social realities of our world like no other. Since the dawn of the Enlightenment, modern technology (before it even existed) has been heralded as our salvation from a variety of evils (disease, starvation, burdensome labor, boredom, etc...). The philosophy of technology seeks to understand this trend and the relation of technology to science, culture, and nature.
Culture 2012-03-30 00:43:20 +0000
Jonathan Lipps

* Hosting Open Source Projects at the OSUOSL

The OSU Open Source Lab provides hosting for a variety of open source projects from around the world. This session will give an overview of the types of projects we host, what types of hosting we provide, what tools we use, and how we provide the hosting.
Culture 2012-03-15 23:44:38 +0000
Lance Albertson

* Open Source, OpenStack, and Cloud

The growth of cloud computing and open source adoption have been closely linked by changes in technology, enterprise computing demands, and economic models, as industry leaders like Amazon, Dell, Rackspace and VMWare have pioneered the cloud-open source evolution.
Culture 2012-03-15 16:33:55 +0000
Boris Renski

* Open Source: Saving the World

Most of us get involved with open source as a way to solve the problems we face on a day-to-day basis. But technology in general, and open source software in particular, also provides the key to solving the more catastrophic problems that people face around the world today.
Culture 2012-03-14 00:37:16 +0000
Noirin Plunkett

* Open-and-Shut? A look at Open Movements

Openness is now the norm in software, what will it take to scale other domains?
Culture 2012-03-31 06:39:09 +0000
Dhananjay Keskar

* Opening Open Source: Making Your Project Friendly to Everyone

Many open source projects run into the question: how do we get more people involved? How do we grow our contributors? How do we make our community more diverse?
Culture 2012-02-28 19:38:27 +0000
Pam Selle

* PDX CitySync Initiative

CitySync is an open platform for tools and services to help residents and local businesses, powered by government and community data.
Culture 2012-03-20 23:05:02 +0000
Rick Nixon

* Pirate Radio and Open Source: The power of subversive technology

Running a radio station is hard, but OSS software helps to fill the gaps. Hear about how House of Sound, Portland's largest free-form radio station (with around 40 DJs per week) uses open source software to solve hard problems like archiving shows, doing playback, improving audio quality, and streaming to the masses on a budget. I'll also talk about the share culture of pirate radio, how it's similar to OSS, and why I think the pirate radio movement has a very important role in the future of our culture.
Culture 2012-03-30 18:56:04 +0000
Kyle Drake

* Reading Rainbow: How to Read Code and Documentation

One of the best methods for learning new coding techniques is to read open source code. However, unlike normal books, code isn't meant to be read from top to bottom, beginning to end. Instead, code is more like a choose-your-own-adventure book, where each function can take you down a different path. I'll highlight some well documented open source projects, what makes them easy to get started for readers, and how to get started learning a new technology. For veteran developers, this talk will point out common pitfalls in documentation and how to avoid them for beginners.
Culture 2012-03-21 18:30:03 +0000
Jerry Cheung

* Seven Essential Skills to Cultivate for Happiness Working in the Open Source World

In this talk, Leslie and Amye will explore 7 essential skills for getting things done in the open source world. Hint: it looks a lot like the skills you need for your day job.
Culture 2012-03-07 23:24:27 +0000
Leslie Hawthorn, Amye Scavarda

* The future federated cloud… how OpenStack is enabling next-generation scientific and humanitarian computing.

Christopher will take a closer look at the future of federated cloud and what that means for cloud computing and humanitarian efforts
Culture 2012-03-16 17:35:18 +0000
Christopher MacGown

* What makes developers happy?

A discussion of what makes working as a developer a pleasant, rewarding experience
Culture 2012-03-30 21:27:26 +0000
Matt Robinson

* What Open Education Can Learn From Open Source

While FLOSS projects aim to acquire contributors, Open Education projects look to acquire users. This talk will look at the current state of Open Education, FLOSS projects are successful in both open and functional contexts, and what FLOSS can do for open education.
Culture 2012-03-30 16:39:40 +0000
Molly de Blanc

* Why Can’t We Just Make It Easy For New Contributors?

During this talk I'll discuss many approaches for making it easier for new contributors to join your project. Any project which makes it easier to bring new contributors on board will find its quality and reputation improving by leaps and bounds. You'll find it’s an effort very much worth making.
Culture 2012-03-16 04:24:56 +0000
VM Brasseur