Hacks track

Tinkering, experimenting and bending the rules to make hardware and software do what we want.
Hacks are clever. They break the rules. They force the available material into doing what you need or want. Some hacks are illegal, and some just make you proud and embarrassed that it worked. Sometimes a hack is the only way. Show the world how you make your hardware and software obey your every whim. Example topics from the past include “Building an embedded Linux system monitoring device” and “Your Shell History In The Cloud.”

Sessions for this track

* 5 Easy Pieces: "Rabid Prototyping" With "Physical Computing" and Other Dirty Tricks.

Magic Windows, Football Field Style Bicycle Race Clocks, Talking Coffee Cups, Space Invaders Style Video Games, and A War On Christmas Lights.
Hacks
Donald Davis

* Cloud Scaling: High Performance Even in Virtualized Environments.

Virtual hosting providers are particularly enticing for startups and new opensource projects, but they come with large and sometimes unexpected drawbacks. Learn what to expect and how to mitigate the worst performance issues you’ll face deploying your services in the cloud.
Hacks
Gavin McQuillan

* Control Emacs with Your Beard: the All-Singing All-Dancing Intro to Hacking the Kinect

See! The Amazing Future of Human-Computer Interaction! Behold! The Awesome Power of Open-Source Libraries and Cheap Video-Game Accessories! Fake Beards!
Hacks
Devin Chalmers, Greg Borenstein

* Drizzle, Virtualizing and Scaling MySQL for the Future

Ever wondered what would happen if you could rethink a decade worth of design changes? Drizzle is a redesign of the MySQL server targeted at web development and optimized for Cloud applications.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* Growing Food with Open Source

Open source folks are naturally lazy. Anything mundane task they can automate, they will. So what does an open source developer do when faced with planning, planting, and tediously watering a garden? Automate!
Hacks
Sarah Sharp

* Hardware/Software Integration with Txtzyme

Hardware running Txtzyme will play well with the shell and other interactive environments. We'll explain the Txtzyme language and show hardware integration examples using bash, perl, ruby, java and javascript.
Hacks
Ward Cunningham

* IRL: How Do Geeks Undermine Their Presentations and Conversations with Body Language

Many geeks are uncomfortable interacting IRL with clients or audiences but you don't have to be. There are some simple physical tricks to keeping an audience (of 1 or 1k) engaged and not undermining your skills and yourself.
Hacks
Sarah Novotny

* Location-Based Hacks - How to Automate Your Life with SMS and GPS

Have you ever wanted to automatically turn on your lights when you get home, or turn them back off when you leave? What about controlling your lights by SMS or IRC? This presentation will teach you how to automate your life with location-based hacks and SMS.
Hacks
Amber Case, Aaron Parecki

* Snooze, the Totally RESTful Language

As you can see we get a "403 Forbidden" in response to our "POST /integer/5/increment"...can anyone tell me why? It worked when we did "PUT /variable/x/let/integer/5" followed by "POST /variable/x/increment", so why can't we do it directly?
Hacks
Markus Roberts

Proposals for this track

* Communicating with Perl and Arduino

Intro to working with an Arduino and your programs. The Internet of Things is here but we can spread it further.
Hacks 2011-01-19 19:52:08 +0000
Robert Blackwell

* JVM goes to BigData

JVM goes to BigData - The Open Source Edition! Concurrency is the currency of scale on multi-core. We take an in depth look & provide hacks to workaround jvm issues in scaling for Big Data & NoSQL stacks!
Hacks 2011-03-17 02:54:41 +0000
Sri Satish Ambati

* Measuring network characteristics using JavaScript

The browser doesn't really allow JavaScript to access anything outside its sandbox, but by understanding how the browser works, and making a few approximations, there's a lot that we can measure using just JavaScript. This talk will go into some of these tricks we developed while building boomerang.
Hacks 2011-03-15 07:06:26 +0000
Philip Tellis

* NoNoSQL: Structured lightweight data models for the Web with RDF

Publish your data to the Web using the W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF). Yeah, *that* W3C.
Hacks 2011-03-30 23:01:42 +0000
Brian Panulla

* Personal Publishing: Curating a Fire hydrant down to a trickle

For years now I have consumed a large amount of feeds in Google Reader. I have also been creating my own content. I have had to build a number of tools to publish the way I want. In my talk I can talk about my system, and how others can build something like it.
Hacks 2011-01-20 06:35:43 +0000
Alex Kessinger

* Scalling, and Deploying Memcached with Libmemcached

Ever wanted to get a bit more out of Memcached? Wondering how to set it up for redundancy or load check your server? This talk will go over all of the latest features to libmemcached including new SSL and configuration data.
Hacks 2011-04-01 05:50:44 +0000
Brian Aker

* Transit data hacking with the mobile web

The initial implementation of Nextbus used a jQTouch-based web client talking to the Translink API via a server-side proxy written in PHP. I eventually added basic stop search history support using localStorage, and recently have re-factored the app significantly: * a less webkit-centric interface * completely new workflow based around Geolocation instead of stop number lookup
Hacks 2011-03-16 05:16:47 +0000
Jeff Griffiths