Hacks track

Tinkering, experimenting and bending the rules to make hardware and software do what we want.
Hacks are clever. They break the rules. They force the available material into doing what you need or want. Some hacks are illegal, and some just make you proud and embarrassed that it worked. Sometimes a hack is the only way. Show the world how you make your hardware and software obey your every whim. Example topics from the past include “Building an embedded Linux system monitoring device” and “Your Shell History In The Cloud.”

Sessions for this track

* Open Source Rockets

PSAS is a student aerospace engineering project at Portland State University. We're building ultra-low-cost, open hardware and open source rockets that feature perhaps the most sophisticated amateur rocket avionics systems out there today.
Hacks
Nathan Bergey, Andrew Greenberg

* Building A Mesh Network Wireless Temperature Sensor

The problem: My HVAC system is not balanced. Easy but boring solution: Hire a qualified contractor to fix it. More interesting solution: Use knowledge from dusty undergrad degree in electronics to cobble together some simple wireless temperature sensors using XBee modules and distribute them around the house. Then use Java programming knowledge to build up a monitoring system using open source software. Attempt to use readings from temperature sensors to figure out what's going on and fix it. This presentation will delve into the hardware and software aspects of the system, although with more emphasis on the software and the role that packages such as Apache Felix and Apache Mina play in the system.
Hacks
Michael Pigg

* Copyright lawyers can Gödel

"This compression algorithm is of course very inefficient, at least when applied to a small collection of documents. But if you were to apply it to a larger collection, say, all the music ever recorded and all movies ever made, some gains may be realized...
Hacks
Markus Roberts

* CouchApp Evently Guided Hack with CouchDB

Learn to hack Evently jQuery CouchApps -- p2p web applications that can be deployed anywhere there's a CouchDB.
Hacks
J Chris Anderson

* Drizzle, Scaling MySQL for the Future

Current state of Drizzle.
Hacks
Brian Aker

* Fixing SSL security: Supplementing the certificate authority model

The most common way of using SSL/TLS encryption relies on a public-key infrastructure that puts near-absolute trust in a large number of entities around the world, any one of which could accidentally or deliberately empower anyone to impersonate any site or service and spy on all of our communications. We've seen that these certificate authorities can make mistakes. We need new mechanisms to meaningfully double-check that they're doing the right thing.
Hacks
Seth Schoen

* Housetruck: Building a Victorian RV

As a "software person," I found the hard technologies of building with steel and wood made for a very different creative and hacking process. At the same time, I discovered many parallels to software development, embedded hardware, and even open-source philosophies.
Hacks
John Labovitz

* iizip: Hacking together your own Dropbox

Dropbox, the leader in online storage and synchronization, is good, but not good enough. Find out how you can hack together your own equivalent that's more flexible, secure and convenient.
Hacks
Ben Dechrau

* import rdma: Zero-copy networking with RDMA and Python

Every time your server sends or receives a packet, it copies it to (or from) a temporary kernel buffer. What an incredible waste of CPU and memory bandwidth! RDMA solves this, at a huge complexity cost. This talk will cover what happens when a dynamic language meets a direct-memory-placement protocol.
Hacks
Andy Grover

* JIT-Compiling Domain Specific Languages

During this talk, we will survey real-world implementations of JIT-compiled embedded DSLs and their applications.
Hacks
Jeremy Voorhis

* Lightning Talks

LIGHTNING TALKS!
Hacks
Peter Fein

* Listening to Data - Sonification Using Open Source Tools

Hearing your data - exploratory data analysis by way of algorithmic composition
Hacks
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

* Multicore Haskell Now!

Multicore computers are here: is your programming language ready?
Hacks
Don Stewart

* Non-visual location-based augmented reality using GPS data

Augmented Reality and Geolocation have been hot topics this year, but there has often been a confusion between aesthetics vs. practicality, and fantasy vs. reality. This presentation will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of visual and non-visual augmented reality. We'll tell stories from our experiences building location-aware social networks with custom proximity notification.
Hacks
Aaron Parecki, Amber Case

* OAuth: an Open Specification for Web Services

Curious about OAuth? Ever wondered why OAuth has steadily gained popularity among major API providers such as Google and Twitter? Ever wondered how OAuth helps streamline consuming data from other providers? Learn more about OAuth the specification and how to implement OAuth with PHP5. The session will cover the basics of OAuth, and follow up with an OAuth implementation using php.net/oauth.
Hacks
John Jawed

* Practical Facebook stalking with Open Source tools

Facebook are full of juicy information about your friends and strangers alike! Learn how to use some simple open source tools and techniques to learn more about them.
Hacks
Paul Fenwick

* Serialist: lazy web-crawling in Haskell

Serialist (http://serialist.net/) provides a way to find, track and read serialized content (e.g., web comics). It's implemented entirely in Haskell and demonstrates functional web application development, crawling, scraping and distributed architecture. Serialist uses interesting graph algorithms to add and step through content lazily.
Hacks
Jamey Sharp, Josh Triplett

* Speeding up your PHP Application

Is your Wordpress site too slow? What's this HipHop PHP thing? How do I write really fast PHP apps? Drop by to get the answers to these questions.
Hacks
Rasmus Lerdorf

* The $2 computer: ultraconstrained devices do your bidding

"Do you watch television? Is your furnace loud? Do you have $2?" My 7-year-old's marketing suggestions aside, building custom gadgets to improve your life is remarkably simple, and I'll prove it by building something on stage that you can duplicate at home.
Hacks
David Hollingsworth

* The Fine Line Between Creepy and Fun

Social software is kind of a big deal right now. In the open-source spirit of transparency and dissection, let's talk about what makes social technology creepy, what makes it fun, and how to hack things to maximize your desired outcome.
Hacks
Audrey Eschright

* When Everything Looks Like A Nail

Markus: Nautilus? I thought you said noodle house! Matt: Wait, wait, I think I see her head!! Markus: Are you sure? Matt: Maybe It's Not Her Head...
Hacks
Markus Roberts, Matt Youell

* X Marks the Spot: Applying OpenStreetMap to the High Seas

The United States has a treasure trove of nautical charts in digital form, including plots of shipwrecks, navigation buoys, coastal and river depths, and other fine booty. OpenStreetMap is an open source, open format collaborative project for building a free map of the world. Join this session to find out more of the marine secrets of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), OpenSeaMap's plans to extend OSM to the high seas, and splicing the two (and your mainbrace) together. We'll use the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL), OGR, Python, and the OSM API.
Hacks
Liz Henry, Danny O'Brien

Proposals for this track

* Building a GNU Cross-Compiler Toolchain for Microcontrollers

What pieces do you need to build code for ARM, AVR and similar microcontrollers? How do you put them together? Why might you do that, instead of just loading a package?
Hacks 2010-03-25 20:28:50 +0000
David Madden

* Dealing the scaling: Goat Rodeo

Join David Pollak, Goat Rodeo's founder, to learn more about how to model your applications using the Goat so that your app can scale from the developers desktop to production to planet-scale without change to the app logic.
Hacks 2010-03-15 21:11:25 +0000
David Pollak

* Developing an Open Source UMPC for Higher Education

The Oregon State Wireless Active Learning Device (OSWALD) is a fully open Ultra-Mobile Personal Computer (UMPC) platform designed, maintained, and used by students. Join us while we discuss the design process, software platform, and challenges we've run into while developing an embedded Linux platform for a custom-made handheld.
Hacks 2010-03-25 21:39:05 +0000
Tim Harder, Ben Goska

* Dynamic Sublists in GNU Mailman

Have you ever just wanted to unsubscribe from one of those tedious threads on your favorite mailing-list? List administrators wouldn't it be nice to allow end-users to unsubscribe from conversations rather then just silently leaving the list? Now you can using Dyanmic Sublists for GNU Mailman.
Hacks 2010-03-30 05:44:22 +0000
Jennifer Redman

* Fiddling with Linux

A violin is an analog instrument beloved throughout the world. I started playing at the end of 2009 and will spare sharing my skills but, I will share Linux tools, scripts and hardware I use to help learn and play.
Hacks 2010-03-26 05:38:45 +0000
Brandon Philips

* Flex from zero to hero

If you are tired of hearing of how Adobe Flex can be used to create MP3 players—and want instead to find out how you can use it to create powerful cross-platform applications—attend this live-coding talk and help build a *useful* application from scratch using Flex and AIR.
Hacks 2010-02-20 02:02:36 +0000
Marco Tabini

* From the Ashes of MetroFi

The Personal Telco Project has been offered a portion of the wireless gear abandoned by the MetroFi muni-wifi failure. We are working on extracting the maximum public benefit from what we ultimately receive.
Hacks 2010-02-24 09:04:44 +0000
Russell Senior

* Geohacking: 2010 Edition

Here's a laundry list of tips, tricks, and hacks you can do with geolocation on the Web today ranging from the mundane to the insane. From viewing multiple datasets on a map to integrating GPS data into a video feed for simultaneous position tracking, you're bound to learn something to improve your stalking... er, I mean build better map-savvy apps.
Hacks 2010-03-25 19:04:19 +0000
Jason Mauer

* How to learn to parse huge XML documents by doing it wrong for 5 years

Tyler Riddle will cover his learning experiences creating the Parse::MediaWikiDump, XML::TreePuller, and MediaWiki::DumpFile modules which are made to handle the 24 gigabyte English Wikipedia dump files in a reasonable time frame.
Hacks 2010-03-22 16:31:19 +0000
Tyler Riddle

* perl5i: Perl 5 Improved

perl5i is a single module bringing together the best magic Perl programmers have to offer catapulting the basic language forward. Suddenly everything is an object! Functions return objects and throw exceptions! You don't have to load six modules to work with files! Perl 5 is fun again!
Hacks 2010-03-26 00:52:24 +0000
Michael Schwern

* Real Time Data Stream Visualization

A customer calls with a simple question, "is everyone down, or is it just us?" Your stomach turns. "Uhhh, I don't know, can I call you right back after I check a few things?!" Don't find yourself in this uncomfortable situation. We have the technology to watch our data in real time in ways that make the health of our systems immediately obvious.
Hacks 2010-03-26 04:35:46 +0000
Tim Freund

* The Future of Mobile: Learn to Build W3C Widgets and Device APIs with PhoneGap

We know the future of the web is mobile, but what's the future of mobile? In this session, you'll learn how to step-up mobile app development with widgets and device APIs. Add these two technologies to your toolbox to begin building next-gen mobile apps today.
Hacks 2010-02-24 22:47:21 +0000
Brian LeRoux

* WebNumbr - Graph anything on the web

Graphs are awesome. Everyone can find graphs for stocks and gas prices, and maybe even Amazon prices if you're good. But how about your twitter list counts, P1 bug reports, server connection count, or flickr pictures per millisecond? Come see a cool tool that will revolutionize your graphing life.
Hacks 2010-02-24 21:02:56 +0000
Paul Tarjan