Culture track

Exploring how open source extends through technology into our communities.
Open source ideas affect things beyond our software, from group organization to creative projects to how we share knowledge. Organizations from the personal to the governmental are influenced by this movement. Even inside open source, we wonder what it can teach us about our groups’ structures, and inclusiveness versus exclusivity. Tell us how open source can inform the entire world and promote transparency in all aspects of life. Example topics from the past include “Building Open Source Communities in Higher Education” and “Organizing a Volunteer-Driven Open Source Community Project.”

Sessions for this track

* Being a Catalyst in Communities - The science behind the open source way

How does Red Hat have wild success with Fedora and other FLOSS projects? By following a method firmly rooted in humanism, practice, and science. Learn in this session how to be an effective catalyst in communities of users, contributors, and businesses.
Karsten Wade

* Free Content for Good: Producing 30 Hour Day

30 Hour Day was the first web-based live streaming telethon of its kind, designed to raise money for local charities in Portland and beyond. In this presentation, I'll share my "eureka moment" when I realized that 30 Hour Day could be the lightening rod for smaller charities in local communities around the world to use our content to raise money and awareness. We'll also have a preview of the next 30 Hour Day (July 2nd & 3rd at Pioneer Courthouse Square) and how you can get involved!
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* Free Speech, Free Software Across the World

How does free software help defend free speech in repressive regimes? Danny O'Brien will draw from the records of the Committee to Protect Journalists to explore how open source can help those at the cutting edge of free expression.
Danny O'Brien

* Geek Choir

This is exactly what it looks like: We're going to make you sing. ;)
Michael Alan Brewer

* Give a Great Tech Talk

Why do so many technical presentations suck? Make sure that yours doesn't. Josh Berkus and Ian Dees will show you how to share your ideas with your audience by speaking effectively and (when the situation warrants it) showing your code.
Josh Berkus, Ian Dees

* Hacking Space Exploration

From creating remote-sensing CubeSats to analyzing aerogel: how the public is hacking into open source space exploration.
Ariel Waldman

* HyperCard 2010: Why Johnny Can't Code (and What We Can Do About It)

Thomas Jefferson envisioned a nation of self-sufficient citizen farmers; programmers like Alan Kay and Bill Atkinson tried to help us code as easily as we might hang a poster on the wall. What happened to the HyperCard ideal? Have we settled for consumption over creation? I will explore the question through a case study, surveying the state of citizen programming in 2010 — from CouchApps to Shoes to plain-jane HTML5+JS to HyperCard 2.4 — and try to convince all comers that realizing the dream of the citizen coder is vital to continuing the ideals of open source.
Devin Chalmers

* Making Robots Accessible to Everyone

I've been looking for an affordable, flexible, easy to learn robotics platform for years that I could use to teach kids the basics of programming/electronics/robotics. Last Fall, I finally found it.
Brett Nelson, Jim Larson

* Move Your Asana

This yoga session is of benefit to anyone who sits and works on computers a lot. Breathing exercises and physical postures that can be done anytime to help maintain a healthy body and clear mind will be taught. Suggestions will be included for how to modify stretches to protect injuries and provide gentle opening.
Sherri Koehler

* Organizing user groups, a panel discussion

User groups are a vital part of the open source community. Learn more about how to start a group, keep it going, and make an existing group better from a panel of experienced user group organizers.
Igal Koshevoy, Jesse Hallett, Eric Wilhelm, Christie Koehler, gabrielle roth, Audrey Eschright, Sam Keen

* The Rise of Hacker Spaces

Leigh will be discussing hacker spaces, and the culture of DIY spaces for making things around the world.
Leigh Honeywell

* Transparent, Collaborative, Participatory - Grass Roots Implementation of the Open Government Directive

The Obama administration signed the Open Government Directive on its first day in office, promising to make government more collaborative, transparent and participatory. This panel will explore nongovernmental projects currently underway throughout the US and world that aim to forward this vision.
Mark Frischmuth

Proposals for this track

* "Thoughtcrime Experiments": CC/FLOSS Lessons From A DIY Sci-Fi Anthology

Last year, two FLOSS enthusiasts edited a Creative Commons-licensed anthology of original fantasy and science fiction stories and art. We did it to give back, to give readers more choices, and because documenting and sharing are in our blood. Here's how we published a great anthology, why, and how you can do it too.
Culture 2010-03-23 17:48:46 +0000
Sumana Harihareswara

* 'But It's Broken!' Advice for First-Time FOSS Project Patch Submitters

You've found a critical error in a widely-used FOSS system, you write a great fix, you submit it... and it is bounced, and you think the reason is lame. What to do? We'll guide you through the political minefield that is submitting your first patch to a FOSS project.
Culture 2010-03-30 06:44:51 +0000
Christophe Pettus, Josh Berkus

* ALM 2.0 – Adopting Open Source Collaboration to Develop Better Software, Faster

This presentation explains how to take advantage of open source collaborative best practices to effectively work across distributed development teams.
Culture 2010-03-26 00:45:13 +0000
Jack Repenning

* Fixing the enterprise: How open source developers got it right, and how to evangelize the heathen

This session covers the best software development practices of open source communities and the applicability of those best practices to the enterprise. Examples will be drawn from the,, and communities, which all develop on the CollabNet Platform, and from CollabNet’s own internal software development efforts.
Culture 2010-03-24 00:13:50 +0000
Jack Repenning

* Hacking the world: effecting positive changes using open source

I don't want to lick envelopes or call donors, I want to get something done! But the organization is horribly underfunded and technically unsophisticated. I know! Open Source Man to the rescue!
Culture 2010-03-29 22:14:43 +0000
David Hollingsworth

* How to Teach Kids to Program Computers

Tips, tricks and a curriculum for teaching children to program computers in your spare time.
Culture 2010-03-29 05:03:46 +0000
Howard Abrams

* Lessons Learned from Open Source Development

Two decades worth of lessons learned around open source development.
Culture 2010-03-25 06:56:50 +0000
Brian Aker

* Please Pirate: Intellectual Unproperty

Information is *already* free! Renounce your rights! Please Pirate is an alternative to copyright.
Culture 2010-03-17 22:12:23 +0000
Peter Fein

* Security vs Usability vs Privacy

Within five years from now the internet as we know it will end. Freedom will no longer be a right, as it will be only available to those who know how to conceal themselves. The media landscape will have changed as well. But there is hope. For every step one takes towards Security one risks loosing out on privacy and usability. But there is hope.
Culture 2010-03-17 12:11:30 +0000
naxxatoe (Sebastian Graf)

* Social Change with Plone

Open source content management systems are now mainstream among non-profit organizations. See examples from live social change sites of how they're taking advantage of Plone to further their missions.
Culture 2010-03-29 22:44:24 +0000
Jon Baldivieso

* Software is Culture

Software development requires not only technology, but also an understanding of engineering economics and human interactions. Engineering economics is the obtaining, allocating and deploying of resources, including individuals with specific skills and temperament, to efficiently develop software that meets the needs and expectations of its users. Programming is considered a technical activity but it is first and foremost a human activity whose success is determined by emotional intelligence, innate talents, personality and communications.
Culture 2010-03-24 23:44:50 +0000
John Prohodsky

* The Complex Ethics of Piracy

The Complex Ethics of Piracy This talk aims to replace the "piracy is good" vs "piracy is theft" debate with a more nuanced understanding. It will investigate when piracy is selfish; when it is civil disobedience; whether it is ever constructive for cultural industries, or whether it is ever, as copyright holders argue, "theft". I will conclude that each of these things is sometimes true about piracy, and that simple views are inadequate for understanding the ethical dimension of copyright infringement. Both pirates and copyright industries need to develop more subtle understandings of the morality of file sharing.
Culture 2010-03-30 04:24:31 +0000
Peter Eckersley

* Thinking Like a Programmer: Building a Programming Curriculum

Let's discuss the development of a beginning Ruby programming curriculum for the general public.
Culture 2010-02-24 05:03:04 +0000
John Metta

* Why the Plone CMS is a good fit for Higher Education and Research

Universities and research organizations often have very specific needs when it comes to content management systems. This talk is a study as to why Plone is often chosen as the ideal CMS due to it's scalability, extensibility and metadata handling capabilities.
Culture 2010-03-26 04:19:26 +0000
Nate Aune