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Day 4: Friday, June 24

Join us at the Eliot Center in Portland, OR (1226 SW Salmon St) for our last day of Open Source Bridge 2016.

Our Friday schedule is entirely in unconference format. What does that mean? Join us at 9am in the Hacker Lounge for a kick-off session and collaborative scheduling. Each of you is welcome to propose a topic for discussion, a question you’d like to answer, or project to work on together. If you’ve never participated in an unconference before, we’ll walk you through it during the kickoff. Today’s activities are open to all registered attendees, including Community Pass holders, so invite a friend! Free childcare is still available in room A108, 8am-6pm.

Our Hacker Lounge is still open for Friday. Show our Lego table some love, share your wisdom with the world at our zine-making space, and DON’T hurt yourself at our soldering station.

For New Attendees!

Our entrance is on Salmon between 12th and 13th.

Please review our Code of Conduct and Recording Policy. There are colored-coded lanyards to let us each indicate whether we would like to be photographed. Get the color that matches your preference at registration, and please be observant of other attendees’ preferences. If you have any questions or issues around Code of Conduct or recording issues, find an organizer (their nametag will say “Organizer” on it) or a volunteer in a yellow Citizen Volunteer shirt.

Use OSB2016 for wifi. It is open.

There are all-women’s and all-gender bathrooms are on every floor. Single occupancy bathrooms are on the third floor next to 302.

Our quiet room is A301 near the all-gender single stall bathrooms.

Annoucements

Kronda Adair holding award

Kronda Adair is the winner of the 2016 Open Source Citizenship Award. Congratulations! You are pretty darn amazing.

If anything you brought to the conference has since gone missing, don’t forget to stop by Lost & Found at the Registration desk.

Return your lanyards before you leave so we can reuse them. They really don’t make that great of a souvenir anyway.

Make sure you’re around (if your travel plans allow) for the wrap-up session at 3:30. You’ll have a chance to share feedback on the conference, the unconference, and talk about what you’ve learned. Let us know what worked and what didn’t, so we can build an even better conference for next year. We are also collecting ideas here.

All good things must come to and end but great things can live on in hashtags: #osb16 (#osbridge for an evergreen hashtag). If you need our immediate attention on Twitter, it’s best to tweet at @osbridge.

Thank you times infinity!

Thank you organizers, for all your hard work planning and coordinating every last thing we needed to be here, at this conference this week. The 2016 organizing team: Thursday Bram, Shawna Scott, Meli Lewis, Julie Pagano, Lauren Voswinkel, Paige Hubbell, Ariel Spear, Dylan Dills, César Sierra, Lauren Hudgins, Ed Groth, Christopher Swenson, Chris Freeman, and kf.

Thank you, volunteers! The hours you put in made this event run smoothly, and created the space for all of us to participate. Open-sourced blessings upon your yellow-clad hearts.

Thank you speakers! Your talks shared valuable lessons, great tricks, and all the nuts and bolts of how we do our work. You built the frame for all the other conversations that we participated in. We’ve learned a lot from you.

Thank you to this year’s sponsors for supporting our Open Source Bridge! Our Silver Level sponsors were Capital One, Google, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews, and New Relic.

We will sincerely miss you. Take care of your wonderful selves. See you next year.

Day 2: Wednesday, June 22

Join us at the Eliot Center in Portland, OR (1226 SW Salmon St) through Friday, June 24. Our keynote begins at 9am in the Sanctuary. Wake up with a little coffee or tea beforehand.

Here is Wednesday’s schedule.

JuliaWednesday’s keynote speaker is Julia Nguyen.

Julia (@fleurchild) is a web and mobile developer, writer, speaker, and computer science student. She organizes mentorship events and workshops at the University of Waterloo Women in Computer Science Undergraduate Committee (WiCS). She also volunteers with Write/Speak/Code, an organization empowering female thought leaders in technical writing, conference speaking, and open source.

Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source

Julia Nguyen leads if me, an app to share mental health experiences with loved ones. In doing so, she has explored her insecurities with mental illness, learned how to engage diverse contributors, and developed better software practices with Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. She’ll share the lessons she has learned from transforming a passion project into an open source project.

Read our interview with Julia.

Out of the Sessions

Our Hacker Lounge will be open during and after sessions throughout the week. Show our Lego table some love, share your wisdom with the world at our zine-making space, and DON’T hurt yourself at our soldering station.

BoFs (Birds of a Feather) happen in two time evening time slots: 7:00–8:30 and 8:30–10:00. We’ll have a sign-up board in the Hacker Lounge. Current proposals are here.

We have a very wonderful LMT in a snug little room toward the back of the Hacker Lounge. Charise will be here Weds and Thurs from 9:30-1:30 and 3:00-5:45.

Announcements & Reminders

Whether this is your first time at Open Source Bridge or not, please review our Code of Conduct and Recording Policy. There are colored-coded lanyards to let us each indicate whether we would like to be photographed. Get the color that matches your preference at registration, and please be observant of other attendees’ preferences. If you have any questions or issues around Code of Conduct or recording issues, find an organizer (their nametag will say “Organizer” on it) or a volunteer in a yellow Citizen Volunteer shirt.

There are all-women’s and all-gender bathrooms are on every floor. Single occupancy bathrooms are on the third floor next to 302.

Our quiet room is A301 near the all-gender single stall bathrooms.

We will not be providing food this year (except at the party on Thursday). If you are unable to leave the venue you can request a runner to pick up lunch for you using this form. If you are able to head out, guides will meet you in the Hacker Lounge to help you find the best lunch spots.

Hashtags! Use #osb16 or #osbridge. (Some online safety event across the pond is also using #OSB16.) We’ll be paying attention to those hashtags and sharing some of them. If you need our immediate attention on Twitter, it’s best to tweet at @osbridge.

Childcare is available in room A108, 8am-6pm through Friday.

Nominations for our Open Source Citizenship Award are open until 11:59pm on Wednesday. You may nominate up to 3 people.

Do you have suggstions for making Open Source Bridge even better? We’re collecting ideas here.

Thanks to all the volunteers that make OSBridge possible. Please consider helping out by volunteering for a shift this week. See the app for empty slots.

Thank you sponsors!

Thank you to this year’s sponsors for supporting our Open Source Bridge! Our Silver Level sponsors are Capital One, Google, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews, and New Relic. Our media sponsors are The Recompiler and opensource.com. You can still donate to our crowdfunding efforts, if you like.

Enjoy your day!

Get to Know Julia Nguyen

Julia Nguyen headshotJulia Nguyen’s keynote speech is Exploring Mental Illness With Open Source, on using technology to share mental health experiences with others.

Julia Nguyen is a web and mobile developer, writer, speaker, and computer science student. She organizes mentorship events and workshops at the University of Waterloo Women in Computer Science Undergraduate Committee (WiCS). She also volunteers with Write/Speak/Code, an organization empowering female thought leaders in technical writing, conference speaking, and open source.

We asked her a few questions about her insights on open source via email.

What got you into open source?

For a long time, I didn’t know I could contribute to open source. I imagined an open source contributor as someone who hacked on the Linux kernel and looked nothing like me. My father installed both Linux and Windows on our family machine. Watching him use it, I thought Linux was something only “elite computer nerds” could use and understand, so I never inquired much about it. We always used open source software because it was often free. We used a lot of products from Mozilla, so I grew up admiring their work and mission.

In high school, I filed bugs for the developer console in Firefox and Thunderbird. Back then, I didn’t think that counted as an open source contribution. I also designed themes for desktop environments like GNOME and KDE. I also did not think that counted as an open source contribution because it wasn’t “intense” low-level programming.

At the University of Waterloo, I studied computer science and was part of the co-op program. When I interned at Communitech, I was tasked to creating an office hours app. While using an MVC called Geddy, I ran into problems and decided to reach out to their developers for help. It felt intimidating using IRC, but the Geddy contributors were friendly and helped me out. They asked me if I wanted to help write documentation. I said yes, but I felt too intimidated later to actually work on it. It wasn’t until my next internship at ThoughtWorks did I feel more confident about contributing to open source. There, I contributed as a developer to the Democracy Now iOS app and the RapidFTR rails app. Until then, I didn’t know it was possible for open source projects to have a social impact. This truly changed the way I thought about open source. Although I was contributing as a developer, I realized that all the prior work I had done in open source was just as valuable. It made me realize that anyone can contribute to open source, not just people who code.

What’s been the best advice you’ve gotten and given over the years?

A culmination of great advice from inspiring friends and mentors I’ve had: “It’s ok to be vulnerable and acknowledge it to those you trust. Everyone fails, struggles, and experiences low moments. The people who use it against you aren’t worth surrounding yourself with. You deserve love, respect, and compassion.”

What do you want people to take away from your upcoming keynote?

I want people to take away is that community is the most important thing we can build. Community isn’t about competition, it isn’t about uplifting one person over the other. It’s about creating safe, nurturing, and inclusive spaces for people to do the best they can and get support along the way. Mental health is part of being human, and sooner we acknowledge that, the sooner people can make the most of communities.

What sessions are you excited about?

I’m looking forward to Taking no as an answer by Terri Oda and The Ability to Disable: Who Did You Forget When You Designed Your UI? by Rebecca Jennings!

Day 1: Tuesday, June 21

Open Source Bridge kicks off tomorrow! We’ll be at the Eliot Center in Portland, OR (1226 SW Salmon St) from Tuesday June 21 through Friday June 24.

Registration opens at 8am and the keynote begins at 9am in the Sanctuary. (Don’t worry, there’s coffee and tea.)

Here is Tuesday’s schedule.

ShaunaTuesday’s keynote speaker is the winner of last year’s Open Source Citizenship Award, Shauna Gordon-McKeon.

Shauna (@shauna_gm) is an independent researcher and developer who focuses on free technologies and communities. She runs a business, Galaxy Rise Consulting, providing web and mobile development and data science services to individuals and organizations. She can often be found using her skills as a writer, public speaker, and teacher to help free software and open science communities more accessible to newcomers.

Free Culture in an Expensive World

Money is a common worry, inside the open source community and out, but we often feel uncomfortable discussing it. Shauna will talk about why that is and how our social norms around money impact who participates in open source and how they do so, in a series of case studies.

Read our interview with Shauna.

Out of the Sessions

Our Hacker Lounge will be open during and after sessions throughout the week. Show our Lego table some love, share your wisdom with the world at our zine-making space, and DON’T hurt yourself at our soldering station.

BoFs (Birds of a Feather) happen in two time evening time slots: 7:00–8:30 and 8:30–10:00. We’ll have a sign-up board in the Hacker Lounge. Current proposals are here.

On Friday, we’ll wrap up the week with a day-long unconference. This is a time to reflect on what we’ve learned and experienced during the previous three days, share ideas that didn’t get space in the formal conference sessions, and play around. We’ll create an unconference schedule together in the Hacker Lounge on Friday morning.

Announcements & Reminders

Whether this is your first time at Open Source Bridge or not, please review our Code of Conduct and Recording Policy. There are colored-coded lanyards to let us each indicate whether we would like to be photographed. Get the color that matches your preference at registration, and please be observant of other attendees’ preferences. If you have any questions or issues around Code of Conduct or recording issues, find an organizer (their nametag will say “Organizer” on it) or a volunteer in a yellow Citizen Volunteer shirt.

We will have a quiet room available if you need some time and space. Ask a volunteer if you’re having a difficult time locating it.

There are all-women’s and all-gender bathrooms are on every floor. Single occupancy bathrooms are on the third floor next to 302

We will not be providing food this year (except at the party on Thursday). If you are unable to leave the venue you can request a runner to pick up lunch for you using this form. If you are able to head out, guides will meet in A108 you to help you find the best lunch spots.

Hashtags! Use #osb16 or #osbridge. (Some online safety event across the pond is also using #OSB16.) We’ll be paying attention to those hashtags and sharing some of them. If you need our immediate attention on Twitter, it’s best to tweet at @osbridge.

Thanks to all the volunteers that make OSBridge possible. Please consider helping out by volunteering for a shift this week. See the app for empty slots!

Thank you sponsors!

Thank you to this year’s sponsors for supporting our Open Source Bridge! Our Silver Level sponsors are Capital One, Google, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews, and New Relic. Our Bronze Level sponsors are Comcast, Lumen, Kavi, Simple, Stich Fix, and ClientJoy. You can still donate to our crowdfunding efforts, if you like.

We are ready for all you wonderful people. Let’s do this.

Volunteer to Get Free One-Day OSBridge Pass!

Attendees sitting in on a session.A message from Volunteer Coordinator Chris Freeman:

NEW! We are now offering a same-day one-day registration pass for those who volunteer for 3 or more hours in a given day (Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday). Sign-up for volunteer shifts using the volunteer app and select your shifts. You will receive a one-day registration code via email.

We continue to offer a full conference registration for those who volunteer for 8 or more hours.

if there are any other issues causing you to hesitate, please let us know at volunteer@opensourcebridge.org

See you at the conference Next Week!